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Nation Topics - History

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Hannah Arendt's The Origins of Totalitarianism is a political
classic trapped in the era in which it was written.

Kwame Anthony Appiah's Cosmopolitanism explores the middle ground between the universal laws of liberalism and relativism's blind respect for all
differences.

Tony Judt's Postwar, a massive summary of European public life since World War II, is a triumph of narrative that will allow readers familiar with the history to experience it again.

Eugene McCarthy was a pure original, a great and good man, whose fundamental historical achievement was to be the standard-bearer for a moral and philosophical campaign against the Vietnam War.

Eugene McCarthy, the Minnesota senator, frequent presidential candidate
and poet who died Saturday at age 89, never had a chance at the
Democratic nomination in 1968. But his passionate anti-Vietnam war
campaign would change the course of the war.

Eugene McCarthy's political life was full of contradictions: A conventional
cold war liberal and fierce anti-Communist, in the Vietnam era, he was
transformed into the standard-bearer of the liberal antiwar movement, a
true hero.

Dorothy Day, founder of the Catholic Worker movement, died 25 years ago this month. Today Catholic Workers are in Cuba, keeping vigil outside the US Naval Prison at Guantanamo Bay and keep a vigil for detainees. This Colman McCarthy meditation on Day's funeral sheds light on Catholic Workers as a political and social force.

America's Constitution: A Biography examines
America's obsession with the Constitution--its origins, evolution and
interpretation.

The Jewish Century defies the conventional view of
Jews as outsiders and traces their symbiotic relationship with
Christians. A History of the Jews in the Modern World follows
the impact the multitude of journeys that Diaspora Jews have taken on
countries in the modern era.

New biographies of Rousseau and Voltaire help us appreciate how
very fragile the eighteenth century's great movement of ideas was, and how remarkable it is that the Enlightenment not only survived but flourished.

Blogs

"Everybody thought everybody was fooling everybody. And both of us were probably right to a certain extent, everybody was fooling each of us."

March 19, 2015

Americans today are a lot more familiar with his presidency than they think they are.

December 3, 2014

Twenty-five years ago, Eric Alterman reminded us that the so-called “experts” were wrong about the Berlin Wall. Some things haven’t changed much.

November 12, 2014

“Socialism is inseparable from democracy,” The Nation wrote in its 1989 editorial.

November 10, 2014

In his new book, John Dean finally offers definitive answers to the questions “What did he know, and when did he know it?”
 

August 14, 2014

The quagmire of the Vietnam War was built on a “queasy foundation of fact and myth.”

July 31, 2014

"About nothing does the mob forget so quickly as about war."

July 28, 2014

Reflections on the meaning of the French Revolution in the shadow of Adolf Hitler.

July 14, 2014

The Nation’s predictive capacities were pretty mixed.

June 28, 2014

The first modern war created the modern Nation.

June 16, 2014