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Nation Topics - History

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As his State of the Union message approaches, we deserve a rest from the fundamentalist presidency of G.W. Bush, whose guiding principles are antithetical to democracy and will only accelerate our decline.

Hannah Arendt's The Origins of Totalitarianism is a political
classic trapped in the era in which it was written.

Kwame Anthony Appiah's Cosmopolitanism explores the middle ground between the universal laws of liberalism and relativism's blind respect for all
differences.

Tony Judt's Postwar, a massive summary of European public life since World War II, is a triumph of narrative that will allow readers familiar with the history to experience it again.

Eugene McCarthy was a pure original, a great and good man, whose fundamental historical achievement was to be the standard-bearer for a moral and philosophical campaign against the Vietnam War.

Eugene McCarthy, the Minnesota senator, frequent presidential candidate
and poet who died Saturday at age 89, never had a chance at the
Democratic nomination in 1968. But his passionate anti-Vietnam war
campaign would change the course of the war.

Eugene McCarthy's political life was full of contradictions: A conventional
cold war liberal and fierce anti-Communist, in the Vietnam era, he was
transformed into the standard-bearer of the liberal antiwar movement, a
true hero.

Dorothy Day, founder of the Catholic Worker movement, died 25 years ago this month. Today Catholic Workers are in Cuba, keeping vigil outside the US Naval Prison at Guantanamo Bay and keep a vigil for detainees. This Colman McCarthy meditation on Day's funeral sheds light on Catholic Workers as a political and social force.

America's Constitution: A Biography examines
America's obsession with the Constitution--its origins, evolution and
interpretation.

The Jewish Century defies the conventional view of
Jews as outsiders and traces their symbiotic relationship with
Christians. A History of the Jews in the Modern World follows
the impact the multitude of journeys that Diaspora Jews have taken on
countries in the modern era.

Blogs

The underlying philosophy of the National Front remains almost exactly the same as it was under Jean-Marie Le Pen.

March 1, 2014

An article in our pages in 1919 helped rescue the long-deceased scribe from obscurity and secured him a prominent place in the American canon.

January 4, 2014

President Hoover's holiday proclamation was offensive to millions of poor and unemployed Americans, our 'Drifter' columnist wrote.

November 23, 2013

John F. Kennedy and the 1950 Senate contest in California.

November 19, 2013

Was there more to JFK than a coiffure arranged by facing south in a strong east wind?

November 9, 2013

Ramachandra Guha’s essay in next week’s issue is only the latest in a long line of critical appreciations of the late historian’s work to be published in The Nation.

November 2, 2013

The famed American conductor brought Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony to a fractured Germany in 1989.

October 7, 2013

Is “collaborators” too strong a word for movie bosses dealing with the Hitler regime?

September 24, 2013

The bombing of Hiroshima changed everything; but it may not be too late to change it back.

August 3, 2013

In our first issue, just after the Civil War, we wrote that in 89 years of celebrating the Fourth of July, never before did Americans have more to rejoice about on Independence Day; in 1991, we asked 100 contributors for their definitions of patriotism.

July 4, 2013