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"Here is a lost cause no longer lost, but come to triumphant success, and if the pioneers of that cause are looking down upon this scene, there will be rejoicing in heaven on the fourth day of March."

Twenty very little men are defendants in a very big trial.

In Zeroville, Steve Erickson explores New Hollywood's promise and doom and the dissolution of cinema into spectacle.

Wall Street crashes; thousands of people are wiped out, but the
worst is yet to come.

LBJ responds to national anger and sends a voting rights bill to Congress. It's a good one, but long overdue.

Sidney Poitier and Tony Curtis are two inmates in a Southern prison who learn to unshackle themselves from hatred.

One of three versions of Ben Hecht and Charles MacArthur's madcap newspaper comedy from a period when reporters probably did call their city rooms and say, "Hello, sweetheart, get rewrite."

The winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature is every bit as political as her predecessors.

A soldier's button says "We Shall Overkill." In Vietnam, it speaks the truth.

Blogs

Yes, The Almanac covered the Clinton impeachment trial back on January 7. But the rules are the rules: seventeen years ago today, Bill Clinton looked America in the eyes and lied.

January 26, 2015

A profile of Bell in The Nation that year reported that the Scot spoke with a "rattling burr that adds piquancy to whatever he says."

January 25, 2015

Not the Winston Churchill who once served on The Nation's editorial board.

January 24, 2015

Sheldon Silver and the history of “Legislative Corruption”.

January 23, 2015

The Nation had an old China hand, blacklisted in the McCarthy era, reflect on the American surrender in Vietnam.

January 23, 2015

After the Supreme Court legalized abortion on this day in 1973, The Nation published an editorial that seems curiously averse to discussion of the actual debate.

January 22, 2015

The Nation greeted the opening act of the Russian Revolution, in March 1917, with an enthusiasm bordering on glee. But how did it eulogize Lenin when seven years later, with actually existing communism already in place?

January 21, 2015

“A thin but pleasant sort of rhetoric” suffused FDR’s second inaugural address, The Nation thought.

January 20, 2015

Why does Europe so love Poe? The Nation’s Simeon Strunsky asked on the writer’s 100th birthday. Because in him “she has caught the true voice of the young world beyond the seas.”

January 19, 2015

The Nation’s editor reports from the conference, where he laments the absence of women, workers and communists.

January 18, 2015