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Using innovative, slow-motion re-enactments, Errol Morris cast new light on the murder of a Dallas policeman. As a result, the man wrongly convicted of the crime went free.

When Mickey Mouse and Donald Duck gave way to Bach and Beethoven, the results were as far out as Pluto.

Steven Spielberg's imaginary childhood friend brought to life, voiced by an aging actress with a two-pack-a-day cigarette habit.

Elia Kazan and Budd Schulberg used this gritty tale of corruption on the New York waterfront to help put a positive spin on ratting out their colleagues.

Frequently listed as the greatest film ever made, Orson Welles's masterpiece is also a thinly veiled biopic of William Randolph Hearst.

The quintessential Robert Altman film featured a cast of hundreds and about an equal number of subplots, but who's complaining?

Sidney Lumet finds the soul of New York City in a bank robbery that goes comically--and tragically--awry.

Angels look for love in some very odd places and discover among other things, a lonely trapeze artist and the real-life Peter Falk (sans raincoat).

This tale of the dissipation of a Welsh coal-mining family at the turn of the twentieth century was intended to be another Gone with the Wind.

Hail Preston Sturges, the king of screwball comedy, whose string of subversive films from 1939 to 1943 rank among Hollywood's funniest ever.

Blogs

The headline of Frank Donner’s open letter to the committee is probably the best The Nation has ever run.

January 27, 2015

Yes, The Almanac covered the Clinton impeachment trial back on January 7. But the rules are the rules: seventeen years ago today, Bill Clinton looked America in the eyes and lied.

January 26, 2015

A profile of Bell in The Nation that year reported that the Scot spoke with a "rattling burr that adds piquancy to whatever he says."

January 25, 2015

Not the Winston Churchill who once served on The Nation's editorial board.

January 24, 2015

Sheldon Silver and the history of “Legislative Corruption”.

January 23, 2015

The Nation had an old China hand, blacklisted in the McCarthy era, reflect on the American surrender in Vietnam.

January 23, 2015

After the Supreme Court legalized abortion on this day in 1973, The Nation published an editorial that seems curiously averse to discussion of the actual debate.

January 22, 2015

The Nation greeted the opening act of the Russian Revolution, in March 1917, with an enthusiasm bordering on glee. But how did it eulogize Lenin when seven years later, with actually existing communism already in place?

January 21, 2015

“A thin but pleasant sort of rhetoric” suffused FDR’s second inaugural address, The Nation thought.

January 20, 2015

Why does Europe so love Poe? The Nation’s Simeon Strunsky asked on the writer’s 100th birthday. Because in him “she has caught the true voice of the young world beyond the seas.”

January 19, 2015