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Three new books explore how an absence of regulation and active
policies of racial exclusion have shaped America's arid suburbs.

Storm-whipped New Orleanians returned to the city to join a joyful second-line parade, a revival of music that made real the triumph of the city's spirit.

Repair America's infrastructure, starting with New
Orleans; resettle displaced people in the city, give them construction
jobs and pay all a fair wage.

Drawing from the New York counterculture in which he immersed himself, Ted
Berrigan's sonnets and other poems sing beautifully about being broken
and graceful and tough.

Kenneth Koch was one of the merrier in the bunch known as the New York
School of poets. But he was more than just a poet of humor. He
sought the essential nature of human existence, and displayed his
infectious awe of the universe in enchanting verse.

In the gloom of post-election 2004 few people, if any, could have
anticipated the wild surprises of 2005. Focusing on three unforeseen
developments of the past year, a meditation on
how life has changed in unexpected ways.

Anne Winters's The Displaced of Capital, winner of the 2005 Lenore Marshall Poetry Prize, is a reflective, documentary and visionary volume of poetry inspired by the city of New York.

If New Orleans is to reclaim its greatness, the scope of the solution must match the scope of the problem. The city could become the nation's classroom by re-engineering levees, responsibly building neighborhoods and schools and repairing the environment, but time is running out.

If a society is measured by the treatment of its prisoners, we are in deeper trouble in New Orleans than we realize. The biggest prison crisis since Attica is now unfolding in the devastated city, with inmates jammed into inadequate facilities, often abused and unrepresented by attorneys or advocates.

The nation might believe it has moved on from Katrina, from the name so
childish and somehow slightly foreign, not Sherry or Ann or Margaret.
Moved on from the scenes of dark-skinned people in

Blogs

The governor says a higher minimum wage in New York City could cause chaos.

February 12, 2014

The mayor traded applause lines for critique and permitted comparisons of his ambition to La Guardia's.

February 10, 2014

Squaring community needs with developers’ desires requires not kinder-and-gentler rezoning but a new process for shaping the city.

February 10, 2014

The Gay Officers Action League supports the mayor's decision not to march, and respects individual officers' right to participate, while calling for allies to join in the boycott.

February 8, 2014

The mayor has named Chirlane McCray to head the Fund to Advance New York City, one of several nonprofits launched by earlier mayors, all of which are stingy with information about donors.

February 7, 2014

Advocates hoped the mayor would bar city uniforms at an event that excludes gay and lesbian groups.

February 5, 2014

The new mayor has a real emergency on his hands.

February 4, 2014

We’re only thirty-four days into the de Blasio administration, but we’ve already seen enough to draw five conclusions about what kind of mayor he’ll be.

February 3, 2014

In February 1914, an editorial warned against allowing a small, privileged driving minority to jeopardize the lives of everyone else.

February 1, 2014

Following through on a key campaign promise, de Blasio agrees to an inclusive reform process for stop-and-frisk—but does it matter?

January 30, 2014