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The Nation

In the Magazine

May 3, 2010

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Cover design by Gene Case & Stephen Kling/Avenging Angels

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Letters

Letter published in the May 3, 2010, issue of The Nation.

Editorials

David Cole on Dawn Johnsen, Greg Kaufmann on Stephen Friedman's windfall profits and Clarissa A. León on Islam Siddiqui, "pesticide pusher"

The current climate change legislation threatens to do more harm than good.

After 9/11, it's less controversial to kill a suspect in cold blood than to hold him in preventive detention.

The former Fed chief makes his case: everyone, and no one, is to blame for the financial crisis.

Columns

Germany has problems--but on healthcare and gun control, it's way ahead of the States.

The first black president has created a definitional crisis for whiteness.

Articles

Don't believe the spin.

Demented deniers, welcome to the USA!

Environmentalists chalk up wins on the ground, putting coal companies on the defensive.

The US military's plans would devastate Guam's environment. Its citizens are fighting back.

To Western consumers, carbon offsets sound good on paper—but the devil is in the details.

 As Washington dithers, sites slated for cleanup long ago continue to threaten human health.

The agency has the tools to regulate greenhouse gases—if Congress doesn't take them away.

Books & the Arts

Book

Juan Carlos Onetti immerses himself in reality just long enough to fashion an escape. This is his peculiar gift.

Art

Miroslav Tichy's haphazard, eccentric photographs are disciplined, even rigorous--and indifferent to the claims of their female subjects.

Crossword

This puzzle originally appeared in the May 1, 1948, issue.

Europe's Answer to Wall Street

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Earth Day

Individuals can be a powerful engine for change by demanding green products and reducing fossil fuel consumption.

Author

Afghanistan Series

Author

Greg Mitchell

Twitter Account: 
@gregmitch

Greg Mitchell writes a daily blog for The Nation focusing on media, politics and culture. He is the former editor of Editor & Publisher and author of thirteen books. His latest book, on the 2012 Obama-Romney race, is Tricks, Lies, and Videotape. His other books include Atomic Cover-Up, The Campaign of the Century (winner of the Goldsmith Book Prize), two books related to WikiLeaks and a pair of books with Robert Jay Lifton on Hiroshima and the death penalty in America. His Twitter feed is @GregMitch and he can be reached at:  epic1934@aol.com.   His personal blog is Pressing Issues.

Beneath the Radar

From education to gun control, progressive movements need to do a better job empowering the people whose interests they claim to serve.

The murder of Jordan Davis—like that of Renisha McBride, Trayvon Martin and so many others—reflects a racist culture in which the black body is considered fair game.

The people celebrate the man and the revolutionary, while venting frustration with the path his party has taken.

Europe’s panic is about race and class, not child abduction.

It’s not just here that the right has gone “wacko”—it isn’t interested in governing effectively in Europe, either. 

Instead of focusing on the psychology of Trayvon Martin’s killer, we should be examining the meaning of his actions.

South Africans of all races have reason to celebrate the life of the country’s first post-apartheid president.

The recent victories of the right-wing, anti-immigrant United Kingdom Independence Party says more about our scapegoats than about its long-term prospects.

Author

Archives

Diary of a Mad Law Professor

My friend L., a magistrate in Britain, is appalled by American-style
sentencing, which has taken hold there recently.

A few weeks ago, if you recall, Britain's Prince Harry was having himself a high old time at a Colonials and Natives party to which he came costumed as a Nazi officer.

There I was, in the basement of the Margaret Mitchell House in Atlanta, enjoying a private tour of the place.

"The black pseudo leader is a parasite," wrote black pseudo-leader Armstrong Williams in October 2004.

I, Condoleezza Rice, was leaning over the kitchen sink, hacking up a half-dozen or so rotisserie chickens and slinging the parts into a serving dish in time for the first of the party guests.

In the postelection world, holding evangelical Protestantism up to the light has become all the rage, which does seem somewhat like shutting the barn door after the horse has left the barn.

Six more days till the election. As of this writing (October 27), nothing is certain. The election polls are bouncing around like yo-yos.

Author

Archives

Sister Citizen

The court’s decision to invalidate the abortion clinic buffer zone limits the privacy women require as participants in a democracy.

What happens when the black experience is relegated to background noise?

Paul Ryan’s racist comments have been the mainstream view of the Democratic Party for decades.

Sooner or later, marriage equality will win. What happens to marriage then?

President Obama’s symbolic recognition of minorities isn’t a substitute for policy, but it does matter.

In crafting laws after the horrifying killings in Connecticut, it’s crucial that we recognize our own collective trauma before we rush to act.

The impact of an Obama presidency is better answered by partisanship than race—but race still matters.

The stakes are high for students unlucky enough to be caught in the crossfire.

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