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As the 2004 election draws nearer and George W. Bush's poll numbers grow
shakier, White House operatives are devoting themselves to coddling the
religious right.

Paul Wellstone won elections as a progressive by energizing and
mobilizing a large base, staying close to community organizing efforts
of all kinds and fearlessly pressing a bold agenda.

During the two years when he was exploring a bid for the 2000 Democratic
presidential nomination, Paul Wellstone spent a lot of time trying to
figure out how a progressive could get elected to

Democrats can win the farm and small-town vote--if they pay
serious attention.

Even though the Joseph Wilson affair has convulsed the capital for many
weeks, much of what makes it important is still ignored.

So Limbaugh has been hooked on pills,
While Bennett's hooked on slots.
Do all the right-wing morals police
Have copybooks with blots?

Twelve years ago, Harris Wofford made healthcare an issue. Promising to
fight for coverage for all, Wofford scored a surprise victory in a
Pennsylvania Senate race--inspiring speculation that a President named
Bush could be beaten in 1992. Wofford handed the issue to Bill Clinton,
who won the election but lost the war by proposing a plan that offered
more in the way of bureaucracy than a clean break with the existing
for-profit system. Since the Clinton crackup, Democrats have struggled
to reassert the healthcare issue. While the 2004 campaign has yet to
experience a "Wofford moment," Dr. Norman Daniels of the Harvard School
of Public Health says rising numbers of uninsured and underinsured
should move healthcare to the fore as an issue. "The question," he says,
"is whether the new crop of candidates will address it effectively."

Enter Representative Jim McDermott, a physician and the new president of
Americans for Democratic Action, who has taken it on himself to sort
through candidate proposals (www.adaction.org). As McDermott sees it,
the plans of Howard Dean, John Edwards, John Kerry and Dick Gephardt
"are all quite similar--they each combine modest expansions of public
sector programs such as Medicaid and [children's health programs] with
private sector initiatives to encourage employers to provide health
insurance for their employees." While under each of these plans the
government becomes an even greater purchaser of healthcare, McDermott
says that "because most of the new expenditures are through the
fragmented private insurance market, the government will continue to
waste its considerable market power." He's still reviewing Lieberman's
plan, which looks to resemble the others.

In contrast, McDermott notes, Representative Dennis Kucinich offers a
single-payer national healthcare plan based on a bill by Representative
John Conyers, of which McDermott is a co-sponsor. While he sees value in
incremental reforms, McDermott says, "I continue to believe that a
national health care plan, with a government-guaranteed revenue stream
for providers, would be most effective in providing universal coverage
and controlling costs while guaranteeing high quality care." A separate
study of the candidate proposals, done by The Commonwealth Fund
(www.cmwf.org), says Kucinich's plan would cover all Americans, while
those of Lieberman, Dean, Gephardt, Kerry and Edwards would leave 9
million to 19 million uninsured. Single-payer backers Al Sharpton and
Carol Moseley Braun have not offered details; Gen. Wesley Clark has yet
to make his views clear.

While McDermott's analysis will please Kucinich backers, his candidate
choice won't. The Congressman just endorsed Dean. Two reasons, he says.
First, "as governor of Vermont, Dean implemented reforms. He got people
covered. One of the problems the Clintons had is that they were starting
without ever having done it. For them, it was theoretical. Experience
helps you avoid big mistakes." Second, "Electability. Dean isn't my
perfect candidate, but I think he can beat Bush. Beating Bush is the
first step toward healthcare reform."

The press seems to think Kucinich isn't serious precisely because he's
serious.

Clark is in a unique position to challenge Bush's foreign policy.

"...interviews last week with historians, advertising executives,
pollsters and Democratic and Republican image-makers turned up this
consensus: Mr.

Blogs

The deal savages programs for the lower and middle classes, while hedge fund managers and oil companies probably won’t sacrifice a cent. 

August 1, 2011

With the exception of Huntsman, the candidates oppose the deal--a sign that the field will push the party even further to the right during the campaign.

August 1, 2011

As a Democratic president bows to the GOP’s far right, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi tells colleagues to vote their consciences. Half of House Democratic Caucus opposes Obama’s position.

August 1, 2011

The IMF warns that an international crisis looms, as Pelosi condemns Boehner for going “to the dark side.”

July 31, 2011

As Boehner battles Bachmannite Republicans who would crash the economy for political purposes, Obama recognizes that the only hope is with the Senate—not a divided and dysfunctional House.

July 29, 2011

 A look back at the lead up to bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. 

July 28, 2011

Tea Party groups have wielded enormous power in the debt ceiling debate, despite a long history of crackpot theories and dirty politics. 

July 28, 2011

President Obama has successfully used the bully pulpit to undermine the case for progressive governance.

July 28, 2011

The Speaker admits that some Republicans want to create chaos in order to blackmail Democrats into passing a balanced budget amendment.

July 27, 2011

Rep. Peter King held his third hearing into domestic Muslim radicalization, but found plenty of time to bash the New York Times along the way.

July 27, 2011