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Nation Topics - Radioactive Waste and Contamination

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Nation Topics - Radioactive Waste and Contamination

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Otsuchi village, Iwate Prefecture, Japan

The problem with mankind wielding nuclear power isn’t about backup generators or safety rules—it’s our essential human fallibility.

Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant

Even if reactor containment vessels hold, pools of spent fuel rods could combust and release clouds of radioactive cesium into the air—a calamity that could happen at US nuclear plants as well.

Our crumbling atomic power stations and the government agency that loves them.

Thirty years after the Three Mile Island partial meltdown, the real nuclear power threat is the relicensing of old plants.

On the morning of September 11, 2001, after the second plane hit the World Trade Center and it was clear that the nation was under attack, US authorities issued an emergency alert, grounding air

Washington continues to evade responsibility for forty-seven years of contamination.

Snoozing guards at Los Alamos, missing vials of plutonium oxide... Yes,
the headlines in late June were announcing "security lapses" again at
national labs and nuclear weapons plants.

There wasn't much good news to report from the year 2000, but topping the list in health terms was the long-overdue final shutdown of the Chernobyl nuclear power station on December 15. Unit Four at the Ukrainian complex blew up in 1986, spewing radioactive death and destruction around the planet. Evidence points to a skyrocketing death rate among the 800,000 "liquidators" who were forced by the Soviet government to help clean up the stricken reactor, while new studies also show escalating cancers among civilians in the downwind areas.

Earlier in the year, on the fourteenth anniversary of the Chernobyl debacle, the Radiation and Public Health Project and Standing for Truth About Radiation (STAR), a national safe-energy organization, released a pathbreaking study showing that radioactive emissions from commercial reactors are having catastrophic health effects on people living near them comparable to those experienced by nuclear weapons workers, for which the Energy Department has finally admitted responsibility. The study, by Joseph Mangano, a nationally known epidemiologist, compared infant death rates in areas surrounding five nuclear power plants while they were operating and in the years after their shutdowns. Mangano found that from 1985 to 1996, average nationwide death rates for infants under the age of 1 dropped 6.4 percent every two years. But in the areas surrounding five reactors closed down between 1987 and 1995, infant death rates dropped an average of 18 percent in the first two years. "It's hard to imagine a clearer correlation," says Mangano. "The fetus in utero and small babies are the most vulnerable to even tiny doses of the kinds of radiation emitted from nuclear power plants. Stop the emissions, and you save the children."

Published in the journal Environmental Epidemiology and Toxicology, Mangano's study covered these reactors: Wisconsin's LaCrosse, which closed in 1987; Rancho Seco, near Sacramento, and Colorado's Ft. St. Vrain, both closed in 1989; Trojan, near Portland, Oregon, which shut in 1992; Connecticut's Millstone plant, which closed in 1995. Later research on two additional reactors, Maine Yankee and Big Rock Point in Michigan, both of which went cold in 1997, showed that infant death rates fell a stunning 33.4 percent and 54.1 percent, respectively.

"Forty-two million Americans live downwind within fifty miles of commercial reactors," says Mangano. "The Nuclear Regulatory Commission allows nuclear plants to emit a certain level of radiation, saying that amount is too low to result in adverse health effects. But it does not do follow-up studies to see if there are excessive infant deaths, birth defects or cancers." Additional research by Mangano also indicates a drop in overall cancer deaths among elderly people living near nuclear plants once they are deactivated.

On June 5 the Supreme Court ruled that some 1,900 central Pennsylvanians living downwind from the Three Mile Island nuclear plant could sue for health damages. Local residents and researchers claim that a plague of death and disease followed the March 28, 1979, radiation leak at TMI Unit 2.

Even longer-overdue justice is coming to workers in the Energy Department's nuclear weapons production facilities. From the 1943 beginnings of the Manhattan Project to the ongoing enrichment of uranium at gigantic plants in Ohio, Kentucky and Tennessee, the government has denied virtually all claims from thousands of workers suffering from a range of radiation-related diseases. But the DOE finally issued a series of sweeping admissions after DOE-sponsored research found excess worker deaths from cancer and other causes at fourteen DOE facilities. A DOE report issued in May confirmed that hundreds of workers at Ohio's Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, whose supervisors did not require them to wear protective masks, routinely inhaled uranium dust, arsenic and other lethal pollutants. President Bill Clinton signed into law a federal compensation program for DOE workers exposed to radiation, beryllium and silica. The program will cover some 600,000 people involved in making nuclear weapons.

The DOE's admissions give new weight to public demands that the commercial reactor industry come to terms with public health risks now that numerous aging and leaky reactors are waiting in line for extended licenses from the NRC. "How much more of this bodies-in-the-morgue approach to public health research do we need?" asks Robert Alvarez, executive director of STAR. "Shutting reactors may save lives. What more needs to be said?"

Eileen Welsome, a mild-mannered 48-year-old reporter laboring away in obscurity for a tiny afternoon newspaper in Albuquerque, New Mexico, is no one's idea of a media Bigfoot.

Blogs

Plagued by poor infrastructure, climate denialism, unregulated fracking wells and nuclear waste sites, the United States is poised to topple itself with self-inflicted wounds.

April 8, 2014

Why are so few talking about the radiation threat soaring the Pacific?

November 15, 2013

What it means, as symbol and reality, then and now.

July 26, 2013

Twenty-six years after the Chernobyl disaster, the US media have yet to print the pictures of Chernobyl now.

April 26, 2012

A contentious House hearing Wednesday featured direct calls for the resignation of NRC Chairman Gregory Jaczko. 

December 14, 2011

Bureaucratic battles reveal the nuclear industry has many friends at the agency which regulates it.  

December 12, 2011

Christian Parenti and MSNBC's Martin Bashir discuss whether or not the US is prepared for future earthquakes.

August 25, 2011

Survivors of the first nuclear tragedies are now campaigning not only against nuclear weapons, but now also against the dangers of nuclear power.

August 9, 2011

In Japan, fears about nuclear fallout have only been getting worse as disaster cleanup crews struggle with radioactive water leaking out of the Fukushima plant.

March 30, 2011

Joining Charlie Rose, Schell explains that nuclear power has no place in a world so vulnerable to widespread disaster.

March 18, 2011