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Nation Topics - Political Figures

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Barack Obama Mitt Romney Paul Ryan Bill Clinton George W. Bush Jesse Jackson Sarah Palin

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President Bush was not deterred by lack of expertise when it came to deciding a highly specialized scientific issue.

Less than a hour after George Bush concluded his party's
have-a-nice-election convention with a vapid but beyond-the-expectations
acceptance speech, a source deep within the Gore camp called me

When Dubya picked Dick Cheney as his running mate, the little screen was
awash in flatulent flatteries from the chattering classes: "a grown-up,"
"presidential," "all steak and no sizzle" were

Ralph Nader, America's indomitable public citizen, is the one great man
in this presidential election.

It must be some playful new postmodernist form of politics: First you
spend years ranting about the plutocracy that has supplanted American
democracy and is rapidly devouring the planet.

Paying off the national debt used to be an obsession of Calvinist
fundamentalists on the fringes of the Republican Party, but this year it
is the boldest banner held aloft by the Democratic Par

It is time to rally around our President and forego the constant drumbeat of criticism that has been his lot on the world stage ever since he discovered that foreign policy involves issues beyond

Perhaps it was because he was recovering from painful back surgery, but a few weeks before the Republican convention, Paul Weyrich, a founder of the religious right, was awful grumpy about George

Where is Al Gore? Maybe he hasn't noticed, but all sorts of horrible things are happening under the Bush Administration--just as he predicted. Yet Gore has been totally silent.

That may be his right as a victim of blatant election fraud, but please don't even suggest that this milquetoast be given another chance to be the Democratic candidate for President. Milquetoast is not a word to be used lightly in describing the shell-shocked behavior of someone cheated out of the presidency, but the wound-licking has gone on long enough.

True, as the New York Times documented in excruciating detail Sunday, a six-month investigation found new evidence that the Florida election was distorted by the partisan miscounting of absentee votes. When added to the rest of the evidence from Florida, it's obvious that Gore won both the national popular and electoral votes and should be President. The Republicans played ugly, they misused the power of Congress and the Florida state government to exclude ballots for Gore while including others with the same flaws for Bush.

It is outrageous that Republican members of the Armed Services Committee bullied the Pentagon into turning over the e-mail addresses and phone numbers of Republicans in the military. The absentee ballots of military personnel registered in Democratic precincts were discounted while those in Republican strongholds containing identical flaws were welcomed.

What the Republicans did was reprehensible, and when combined with the foul partisanship of the Supreme Court majority, arguably the lowest point in modern American electoral history. But that's all the more reason to take them on now before they do more damage.

If Gore cared about the issues he raised during the campaign, why isn't he front and center in the leadership of the loyal opposition? He's not the only one hurting, it's the whole country.

While Gore, who decisively won the popular vote, sulks, George the Second seems to wake up each morning convinced that he has a mandate to do as much damage to foreign and domestic policy as possible. He acts as if anointed, although it was certainly not by the voters.

Not content with dismissing the Antiballistic Missile Treaty as a relic, he now threatens to destroy the test ban treaty as well.

Global warming is to be accepted as quite possibly a good thing, energy conservation is dismissed as a foolish notion and the vital work of Planned Parenthood and other world population-control groups has been sacrificed on the altar of Republican fundamentalism.

In a con act that would land a private-sector executive in jail, Bush sold Congress on a mythical recession-proof budget surplus that could be both given away as a tax rebate and simultaneously spent on increased military spending.

If the recession is prolonged, as it now threatens to be, the projected surplus will shrivel further, and long-term funding for Social Security and Medicare once again will be threatened.

Is Gore unaware that the high-tech economy, which the Clinton Administration nourished for eight years, is now in shambles and that the net worth of the average American is in serious decline?

The job market was never better than under Bill Clinton, and it's not too much to expect Gore to hold the Republicans, who have controlled both houses of Congress and the White House, responsible for the loss of 300,000 jobs in the last three months alone.

For eight years we were told that it was Alan Greenspan who deserved the credit for the unprecedented prosperity of the US economy, but now that the Fed chief has been exposed as powerless as the Wizard of Oz, Gore should at least credit the Democrats for having a better way.

Clinton's agenda was pretty moderate, but at least he knew that the federal government was not the enemy and that a massive tax cut for the rich was hardly a prudent alternative to adequately funding essential public services.

Clinton's personal behavior may have been juvenile, but his public policies were most often well thought out and serious. The Bush offspring seems to view the making of public policy as nothing more than the collating of corporate lobbyists' wish lists.

Gore will not defend the achievements of the Clinton-Gore years because he still has problems admitting that he was a member of that winning team. His Clinton phobia is what cost Gore a tamper-proof win in the election, and it's the source of his current failure to effectively critique the Bush Administration.

To put it bluntly: Gore is nothing without Clinton, and his inability to boldly champion the eight years of the Clinton Administration's record has rendered him politically impotent.

Blogs

Immigrants and allies rallied in more than a dozen US cities on Thursday to ask President Obama to use his executive authority to stop deportations of undocumented workers and their families.

August 28, 2014

Ryan still doesn’t get that attacking Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid is political nonstarter.

August 21, 2014

Undocumented immigrants and their advocates are concerned that the president’s orders will be far more limited than the hype suggests—and they’re trying to raise the bar for what aggressive action really means.

August 21, 2014

At the heart of Christie’s campaign is a plan to drive a wedge between state workers and middle-class taxpayers.

August 15, 2014

Polls show surprising support among Republicans for the New Jersey governor.

August 8, 2014

Lawmakers say the CIA redacted “key facts” from a long-awaited investigation into the agency’s cruel interrogation tactics.

August 6, 2014

Katrina vanden Heuvel appears on Morning Joe to discuss how Washington’s recent policy polls reflect American sentiments on the government’s role in leading the country in the wrong direction.

August 6, 2014

A surprise announcement planned for after Labor Day could stop millions of deportations.

August 6, 2014

GOP voters wax nostalgic for the former Massachusetts governor, while seeming to favor the New Jersey governor in polls.

August 6, 2014