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Scratch a philosopher, find a reductionist revolutionary.

The estimates of the number of books written about World War I are in the hundreds of thousands.

Has anyone read John Dennis? Irving Babbitt? Gorham Munson? Probably not, though they were considered important critics in their day.

"Austria had many geniuses, and that was probably its undoing."
    --Robert Musil

Thomas Wolfe wrote that you can't go home again. Alix Kates Shulman disagrees.

If Russia is not to dissolve like the Soviet Union or, worse yet, end in a cataclysm like Yugoslavia's, it must negotiate peacefully across a welter of emotional claims to self-determination.

Public scandals are America's favorite parlor sport. Learning about the flaws and misdeeds of the rich and famous seems to satisfy our egalitarian yearnings.

This book is aimed at business executives, but political reporters may have to read it too, now that Republican front-runner George W. Bush has decided that global warming is real after all.

A few years ago, one of Lebanon's giddier periodicals, suitably titled Prestige, published as its cover story an interview with a Lebanese celebrity.

Early in Hannibal, Thomas Harris's hungrily anticipated sequel to The Silence of the Lambs, an Italian chief investigator on the trail of Dr.

Blogs

New novels, poetry and short-story collections from up-and-coming and established writers of color.

September 24, 2013

Is “collaborators” too strong a word for movie bosses dealing with the Hitler regime?

September 24, 2013

The author's absorbing debut novel chronicles a young woman’s year in Paris, where she will have to choose the home wants most. 

September 13, 2013

The conversation about diversity in Science Fiction & Fantasy reveals how racism constrains even imagination. 

September 10, 2013

Literary conversations are not representative of the diversity of modern letters. We can and I will do better. 

September 9, 2013

Baldwin published his first piece in The Nation, and for many years thereafter continued to attack a system he thought as close to anarchy as to martial law.

August 10, 2013

The bombing of Hiroshima changed everything; but it may not be too late to change it back.

August 3, 2013

Crucifixion was the punishment that Rome reserved for the crime of sedition.

July 25, 2013

In our first issue, just after the Civil War, we wrote that in 89 years of celebrating the Fourth of July, never before did Americans have more to rejoice about on Independence Day; in 1991, we asked 100 contributors for their definitions of patriotism.

July 4, 2013

The debate surrounding Baz Luhrmann’s film adaptation is nothing new.

May 18, 2013