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October 3, 2005 | The Nation

In the Magazine

October 3, 2005

Cover: Cover by Gene Case & Stephen Kling/Avenging Angels

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2004

Curtis Wilkie explores how New Orleans got where it
was and what it needs to get where it's going. Roberto
Lovato exposes the strategic Pentagon pursuit of Latino bodies
to serve in the US military. Russell Platt reviews
Joseph Horowitz's take on the rise and fall of the classical music
genre in America.

Editorials

Some people are scaring themselves about the wrong
things in ways that are doing terrorists' work for them. Here's one
physician's prescription for bringing irrational fears under control.

As a handful of maverick lawmakers hold unofficial
hearings on an Iraq exit strategy, how long will it take
Democrats and Republicans on the Hill to recognize the growing distaste
for this war?

When one of New York's biggest and most liberal institutions gets into the business of union-busting, it's hardly an internal matter.

The only bright spot in this man-made disaster has been the wave of public outrage at the Administration's failure to provide aid to the most vulnerable.

What happened in New Orleans is an extreme and criminally tragic consequence of the belief that cutting public spending makes for a better society.

The reconstruction of New Orleans could set the stage for a comprehensive legislative initiative akin to the New Deal.

Our strategy ought not to be to fight every prospective terrorist to the death in Iraq, but to deny them the cause that has swollen their ranks--our continuing presence there.

Columns

Column Left

It takes a hurricane to raise awareness that the
numbers of poor people are growing on George Bush's watch. Will that be
enough for the President to begin to level the playing field?

Music

Intellectually, scientifically, even artistically, fundamentalism is a road to nowhere, because it insists on fidelity to revealed truths that are not true.

There are decades of memos from engineers and contractors setting forth budgets to build up the Gulf Coast's levees, but Bush wouldn't let them be.

Articles

New homes for those displaced by Hurricane Katrina need not be the
penitentiary-style public housing we've come to dread. Bring in
architects who know how to create human-scale dwellings for the poor.

Americans care about the environment, but the Bush Administration clearly doesn't. Blame it on Republican ideology and the apocalyptic religious sensibilities of his political base.

New Orleans, a city full of idiosyncrasies, must be restored for the benefit of the nation as a whole.

Sources on the ground in Iraq say that serious moves toward a pullout will dry up recruitment efforts for jihadi groups.

In the face of unprecedented manpower problems, the Pentagon is spending hundreds of millions of dollars to target young Latinos for military recruitment.

Antiwar Democrats in Washington are facing a moment of truth: Now is the time to raise the volume on the previously taboo discussion of a real exit strategy from Iraq.

Books & the Arts

Book

Joseph Horowitz diligently lays out the immense problems that face American classical music today, and his warnings cannot go unheeded.

Book

Barbara Ehrenreich probes a deeper level of white-collar angst: people who lose or quit their corporate jobs and routinely spend months, even years, finding another.

Book

It has almost become a sadness to review a novel by Salman Rushdie. Shalimar the Clown is no exception.

Book

It can't be easy to rein in a writer as successful as Zadie Smith. Her new novel, On Beauty, proves it's almost impossible.