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November 7, 2011 | The Nation

In the Magazine

November 7, 2011

Cover: Cover design by Milton Glaser Incorporated

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Stephen Lerner on Occupy Wall Street, Michelle Chase on Cuba's economic reforms and Calvin Trillin on Herman Cain

Letters

Do we expect more of a black president?

Editorials

As the Congressional budget supercommittee deliberates, fiscal hawks are calling for “tough choices.” The 99 percent are demanding economic justice.

Its power lies not in any specific demands, endorsements or alliances but in its direct appeal to the hearts and minds of the population at large.

Liza Featherstone on Walmart’s efforts to “empower” women, Collier Meyerson on the inconvenient truth behind Waiting for “Superman” and Henri Picciotto on censorship by the Jewish Federations of North America

Groups long committed to challenging inequality and the power of big banks are joining the Occupy movement, in a mutually reinforcing relationship.

Columns

Don't be left behind: everyone from Jeffrey Sachs to Deepak Chopra and Suze Orman is jumping on the Occupy Wall Street wagon.

What the legacies of Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth, Derrick Bell and Steve Jobs could teach the protesters.

Articles

A powerful, bipartisan coalition of deficit hawks has manufactured a center-right consensus that dominates the Beltway.

Anti-sweatshop activists are embracing Alta Gracia, a company that is going head-to-head with brands like Nike to sell socially responsible clothing on college campuses.

As Occupy Wall Street goes global, we must define a bold, clear vision going forward. The stakes have never been higher.

Under Raúl Castro, major economic reforms are shrinking the state-run economy and making room for a greatly expanded private sector.

Books & the Arts

Art

MoMA’s de Kooning retrospective.

Book

The body of the church of Scientology is not well. Will its main legacy be its contribution to US tax law?

Book

With We Others, Steven Millhauser remains the master of the inevitable ending in American fiction.