Quantcast

November 29, 1999 | The Nation

In the Magazine

November 29, 1999

Cover:

Browse Selections From Recent Years

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

Editorials

Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson's factual findings in United States v. Microsoft, released November 5, spell the doom of Microsoft as we have known it.

Columns

Articles

If you combined the political roles of Republican front-runner George W.

Armed militias had forced most journalists to flee from East Timor by September 7, the day then-President B.J. Habibie and General Wiranto of Indonesia declared martial law for the region.

The recent CBS-Viacom-bination--at $37 billion, the largest media deal ever--mirrored previous purchases, like Disney's acquisition of Capital Cities/ABC and Time Warner's taking of Turner Broadc

Ten years ago, as Hungary was roiling with democratic protests, the country had two television channels, both controlled by the state.

This article is adapted from Robert W. McChesney's Rich Media, Poor Democracy (Illinois).
Three charts accompany this article: "Global Media Moguls," "Who Owns the Movies?" and "Who Owns the Music?"

In May 1989 a small group of radio and newspaper journalists and media activists from Belgrade took over a small room in Central Belgrade that the Central Committee of the Yugoslav Communist Part

Books & the Arts

Art

The Triumph of the New York School, a deeply ironic painting by the American artist Mark Tansey, looks at first sight like a rotogravure depiction of a military surrender that took place l

Art

A shark swims past me in a kelp forest that sways back and forth with the current. It is deliberate and focused.

In 1989, after several years of controversy, legal wrangling and numerous public forums, Richard Serra's sculptural installation Tilted Arc was removed from a federal plaza in New York Cit

New York City Mayor Rudolph Giuliani has created enormous consternation and publicity in his attempts to censor an exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum of Art.

Film

When people label a film "great," the usual effect is to close off a discussion that ought to be opening.