Quantcast

November 25, 2002 | The Nation

In the Magazine

November 25, 2002

Cover:

Browse Selections From Recent Years

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

Nation editors reflect on the rampaging Republicans, Kenneth Rapoza considers the future of neoliberalism in Brazil and David Ost examines Poland's unemployment crisis.

Letters


MUSLIMS (& OTHERS) MARCH

London


Abby Aguirre's October 10, 2002, web-only piece on e-mail harassment of Palestinian activists inspired many letters to the edito

Editorials

Neoliberalism lost the elections in Brazil by a landslide on October 27,
when 52.8 million people rested their hopes on Luiz Inácio "Lula"
da Silva to revitalize the national economy and

The Republican wave that swept the country seemed to crash and recede
right at the California border, but only barely.

George W. Bush may have lost the 2000 election, but he won the 2002
election--with a good deal of help from Democrats, who took a dream
scenario and turned it into a political nightmare.

It's hard to beat something with nothing.

The President, let's understand, won a historic victory by committing
politics--shrewd, aggressive, old-fashioned, take-no-prisoners
politics--while the opposition party did the opposite.

Columns

scheer

To placate its powerful allies on the extreme right, the Bush Administration is once again playing political games with the fate of our planet.

Stop the Presses

The more things change...

(With apologies, once again, to Stephen Sondheim and his demon barber)

Articles

The night after the Bush Administration announced its refusal to grant the United Nations Population Fund $34 million dollars, Jane Roberts was so outraged she couldn't sleep.

How many of you believe that crucial healthcare issues are falsely
represented by corporate America for profit or political advantage?

The year since Congress passed the USA Patriot Act has brought an ever-growing enemies list from our nation's thought police.

For some of progressive cast, there was at least one thin silver lining to Tuesday's crushing Democratic defeat: For the first time in decades, Jesse Helms wasn't running, and come January he'll

As Congress squabbles over how and whether to revamp the welfare law,
one thing is clear: The Bush Administration has marriage on the mind.
The Administration has already promised to make marri

A new democratic left is emerging for the first time since 1989.

Trading in their books for buckets, welfare recipients learn
"responsibility."

Right-wing foundation seeks eligible young women for meaningful,
long-term relationship.

Books & the Arts

Film

It's rude of me to speak of Todd Haynes's new picture as if it were a
symptom; but then, he's the one who's always consulting doctors.

Book

If you've never set foot in the likes of Club Paradise, Scarlett's, New
York Dolls, Secrets, Peepers or the boldly named Booby Trap (yes, it
does exist), your image of a strip club might be bor

Book

As truth-tellers, journalists remain the undocumented aliens of the
knowledge industry, operating in an off-the-books epistemological
economy apart from philosophers and scientists on one side

Book

Michael Bellesiles, the historian accused of research falsification in
his book Arming America, a study of gun culture, announced on
October 25 that he was resigning from Emory Universit

Book

On January 20, 1995, Bruno Jordan is gunned down in a parking lot in El Paso, Texas, in what appears to be a botched carjacking.