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May 8, 2000 | The Nation

In the Magazine

May 8, 2000

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Editorials

The thousands of protesters who danced, marched and, in a few cases, got
clubbed by police as they tried to shut down the meetings of the World
Bank and the International Monetary Fund in Washi

The federal law that gave us "welfare reform" expires in September 2002.

Columns

Stop the Presses

When we last visited New York Times foreign affairs pundit Thomas Friedman during last year's Seattle protests, he was attacking critics of the antidemocratic World Trade Organization as a

Articles

A quarter-century after the end of the Vietnam War, and eleven years after the collapse of the Berlin wall, it has become commonplace to say that we Americans have no consensus on foreign policy.

The power of the market, and of the giant corporations that dominate it, is the overriding political fact of our time.

Holly Burkhalter

Holly Burkhalter has more than twenty years' experience in the human rights field.

The turn of the millennium provided yet another occasion to celebrate a triumphant American Century.

During the eighties many activists in the United States and elsewhere embraced a simple but evocative slogan: "think globally, act locally." The message: In acting at the local level, one needed

Books & the Arts

Art

A woman I know once agreed to take a young Asian child to visit a school in New York, to which her distant parents considered sending her.

Film

Since you presumably know the basics about the Holocaust--if you don't, I would suggest that a movie review is no place to learn them--I will jump to the main question about The Specialist

Book

With the twenty-fifth anniversary of the American withdrawal from Vietnam hard upon us, readers and viewers may well be treated to a multitude of reprises of the arguments surrounding the war and

Book

In Moby-Dick, in the chapter "The Fossil Whale," Ishmael proclaims: "To produce a mighty book, you must choose a mighty theme." The theme of Joyce Carol Oates's Blonde--well, it's a