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March 28, 2005 | The Nation

In the Magazine

March 28, 2005

Cover:

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Karen Houppert looks at the new face of protest, Roberta Brandes Gratz and Stephen Goldsmith reflect on The Gates and Annia Ciezadlo writes from Beirut.

Letters

CHUNNEL VISION

Washington, DC

Editorials

DEATH AT THE CHECKPOINT

Masthead watchers will note that with this issue I have dropped the
editorial director half of my title. This change is recognition of a
happy reality.

From everywhere people flocked to New York City to experience the
extraordinary installation in Central Park by the environmental artists
Christo and his wife, Jeanne-Claude.

The recent United Nations Commission of Inquiry's report on Darfur may
be right or wrong in claiming that the atrocities committed in the
region do not amount to genocide.

Ever since a massive bomb killed former prime minister Rafik Hariri on
February 14, downtown Beirut has evolved into a solemn carnival, halfway
between a wake and a rave.

In what is being called the "cedar revolution," demonstrators in Beirut
brought down the pro-Syrian government at the end of February and forced
Damascus to announce the withdrawal of its 14,00

Columns

Column Left

Lesson No. 1: Campaign cash is worth more than family values.

As Jesus said to render unto Caesar
A portion of thy grain or of thy stock,
Our policy's to render unto Caesar
In hopes that he'll apply electric shock.

It started off as a joke and has now become vaguely serious: the idea that Bono might be named president of the World Bank.

That the Boston Globe is a great newspaper can be in no doubt, as its brave (though flawed) reporting on sexual abuse in the Catholic Church has recently demonstrated.

It seemed too bizarre to be anything but apocryphal, but, hey, I heard it on NPR: William Poole, a high school junior from Kentucky, was taken into custody and charged with threatening to commit

Articles

Though promoted as an antiracist event, the rally lamented the state of the corporate music industry generally.

Low-ranking soldiers are taking the blame in the torture scandal while higher-ups get a pass.

The barricades went up in Salamanca on December 30.

Wal-Mart hopes to defeat its opponents by exploiting their racial divisions.

Antiwar activists cultivate military allies.

Books & the Arts

Book

Nineteen sixty-eight came early to Italy--it began with student protests at the University of Trento in 1967--and lasted longer, arguably, than anywhere else.

Book

Although revered in certain circles as something close to holy writ, Edward W.