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June 21, 2004 | The Nation

In the Magazine

June 21, 2004

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Tim Shorrock looks into a private company involved in the Abu Ghraib abuses, Tom Hayden explores the Indian revolt in Bolivia and Douglas Wolk reviews Magnetic Fields.

Letters


PEOPLE'S HISTORY: NO TO WAR

Boston

Editorials

Rest assured that the radical reworking of history that America witnessed in the hours after Ronald Reagan died Saturday at age 93 will be temporary.

The old left lost a stalwart and The Nation a friend when William Reuben died recently at age 89. Reuben, whose books include The Atom Spy Hoax and The Honorable Mr.

This article represents Trudy Lieberman's personal views, not those of Consumers Union.

Last November Foreign Affairs, the prestigious journal of the Council on Foreign Relations, published a review of The Pinochet File: A Declassified Dossier on Atrocity and Accountabilit

In his now-famous report on Abu Ghraib prison, Maj. Gen.

On the day Senator John Kerry gave a Big Speech on national security, Win Without War--a coalition of forty-two antiwar organizations--called for the Administration to set a specific date for the

We have paid a heavy price for the Bush Administration's unnecessary and illegal invasion of Iraq: more than 800 American soldiers dead; more than 4,500 wounded or maimed; and $120 billion wasted

Columns

Stop the Presses

It may have the ring of cliché, but America's next presidential election will be among the most crucial events in contemporary history.

Music

As crises go, medical insurance is not a very sexy one.

You'll have a government real soon.
You'll see democracy writ large.
We promised sovereignty. It's yours.
And worry not: We're still in charge.

Articles

The US policies of economic globalization and militarization are failing.

The quest for homeland security is heading, in ad hoc fashion, toward the quasi militarization of everyday life.

A political slogan is not a strategy for national defense.

Books & the Arts

Film

When you go to the Human Rights Watch International Film Festival, you expect the screen to be a window onto the world.

Music

About fifteen years ago, looking for something to play on my college radio station, I cued up a reel-to-reel tape I'd found in a pile by the wall--and fell in love.

Book

David Brooks is a writer whose chief claim to fame is not what he says but where he says it.

Book

Dressed up as a tropical dictator in a sketch by the great Italian political cartoonist Altan, Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi wears a double-breasted camouflage jacket, a goony grin on his face