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June 19, 2006 | The Nation

In the Magazine

June 19, 2006

Cover: Cover design by Gene Case & Stephen Kling/Avenging Angels

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Barbara Garson ponders the consequences of pieing the President, Alexander Cockburn writes on failed hopes for Palestine, Stuart Klawans reviews A Prairie Home Companion and The Da Vinci Code.

Editorials

Tom DeLay has left Congress, but his legacy lives on in the work
of five disciples.

The Haditha massacre cannot be blamed solely on soldiers gone berserk.
The Marine Corps cover-up suggests that moral damage from the Iraq War
has affected more than a single debased unit.

Herman Schwartz was named by Alliance for Justice as its 2006 Champion
of Justice.

John Tester's populist politics and country style make him the perfect
candidate to unseat Senator Conrad Burns. Next step is for the progressive
Montana farmer to win the June 6 primary.

Desperate for medical care, an ailing granny pies the President and
finds a soft bed in a country club prison. It's enough to make you go
out and commit a crime.

True reform in the wake of the Enron scandal means tightening the standards of corporate law so that executives who abuse their power are held accountable for their crimes.

Columns

TruthDig

Five unrepentant media giants, complicit in the hidden agendas of government leakers, now pay the price for their unethical reporting on Wen Ho Lee.

Howl

When a group of international journalists visited a small town in Maine, they made it clear that America's aggression in Iraq, its greed and the advance of pop culture are leading onetime allies to desert us.

The Colorado Rockies recruit Christian players and claim God is at work on their game. Major League Baseball woos evangelicals with special "Faith Days at the Park." Something's going on here, but it has nothing to do with God.

Israel's strategy in 1948 continues today: Make life so awful for
Palestinians that most will depart, leaving a few bankrupt ghettos as
memorials to the hopes for a Palestinian state.

A contrite Commander in Chief will watch his words from here on.

Articles

Goldman Sachs chairman and CEO Henry Paulson faces ethical, political
and economic challenges if confirmed as Bush's latest Treasury Secretary.

As hurricane season began in earnest, Ray Nagin, who famously declared New Orleans a "chocolate city," began his second term as mayor. What better time to appreciate the way George Clinton, America's should-be poet laureate, has funked up politics?

Evo Morales and his Movement Toward Socialism party face two formidable
foes: a far left discontented with neoliberalism and a combative rancher-based right wing.

With or without a comprehensive immigration bill, a working-class
immigrant Latino movement is emerging--allied with progressive
groups--that could reverse a tide of xenophobia and make significant
gains.

The vitality of the new Latino-led immigration movement could provide
the spark to jolt the civil rights movement out of its complacency and
create a shared notion of an imagined future.

Grassroots activists tap into the momentum of the immigrant rights
movement to bring blacks and Latinos together on shared concerns.

As they push for immigrants rights legislation--and brace for the
inevitable backlash--a diverse array of emerging leaders have their
eyes on a larger prize.

The University of California has thrown its weight behind an
antisweatshop initiative on campus logowear, proof that conscientious
consumers can humanize the forces of global capitalism.

Books & the Arts

Film

Reviews of the Human Rights Watch International Film Festival, A
Prairie Home Companion
and The Da Vinci Code.

Book

Like radical Islamists and American interventionists, Ayaan Hirsi Ali's The Caged Virgin and Irshad Manji's The Trouble With Islam Today express great concern for Muslim women. But the trouble is not necessarily with Islam.