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June 12, 2006 Issue

Cover art by: Cover photo-illustration by Gene Case & Stephen Kling/Avenging Angels

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  • Features

    Galbraith Remembered

    At a memorial service for John Kenneth Galbraith at Harvard University's Memorial Church, economist and biographer Richard Parker eulogized an extraordinary man.

    Richard Parker

  • Road to Perdition

    A nearly forgotten criminal conspiracy by GM, Firestone and Chevron shut down the nation's municipal railways, replacing them with gas-guzzling bus lines, paving the way for global warming and for our energy crisis.

    Morton Mintz

  • Leap into the Fray

    The new generation of academics and scholars is challenged to join, elevate and improve the national conversation, and persuade the public to come back to politics.

    Victor Navasky

  • The Political Power of Words

    The X factor in the midterm elections may well be the English language--specifically, the biased terminology that seeps unchallenged into mainstream media political coverage.

    Dean Powers

  • MySpace, MyPolitics

    The massive immigrant rights protests drew participants via technology-driven organizing, from text messaging to social networks like MySpace. Is this the shape of political campaigns to come?

    Ari Melber

  • Teamsters: Changing to Win?

    A strong Teamsters union is a powerful weapon in the fight for all working people. But the Teamsters need to rebuild their own house before they can rebuild labor's.

    William Johnson

  • Ricky Williams Dreams of Canada

    Former Heisman trophy winner and ganja-smoking peacenik Ricky Williams is contemplating the sweet life in the Canadian Football League. Here's hoping he finds it.

    Dave Zirin

  • Sorel’s People

    In Literary Lives, caricaturist Edward Sorel tells all and then some about giants like Yeats, Proust, Hellman and Jung within the humble frame of a comic strip.

    Richard Lingeman

  • Big Brother Bugs Portland

    Why does the FBI find it necessary to spy on Portand's City Council?

    Simon Maxwell Apter

  • Colombia’s Deep Divide

    Colombia's subtly demagogic President Uribe gained the advantage in the upcoming election by leveraging the strength of anti-left paramilitaries, drug trafficking and a culture of violence.

    Christian Parenti

  • Cindy Sheehan: Mother of a Movement?

    Cindy Sheehan is more a symbol of the peace movement than its leader, a unifying force who seeks to bridge divisions among those who seek an end to war.

    Karen Houppert

  • Editorials

    Drug War Flunks Out

    Students for Sensible Drug Policy and the ACLU are challenging a draconian Education Department rule that blocks student drug offenders from receiving federal aid.

    Hasdai Westbrook

  • Why Mine Deaths Are Up

    The May 20 mine disaster presents more evidence that the Bush Administration places miners in peril with budget cuts, regulatory rollbacks and industry-friendly appointees.

    Peter Dreier

  • Gore Warms Up

    Al Gore is trying to save the world by stirring a nation in denial over global warming to meaningful action. The pity is that this is a job for a former politician, not a current one.

    David Corn

  • Status Quo Gitmo

    Progressives have sparked courtroom litigation and social protest to focus public attention on Guantánamo. Now the Bush Administration should shut it down.

    the Editors

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  • Books and the Arts

    Road to Perdition

    A nearly forgotten criminal conspiracy by GM, Firestone and Chevron shut down the nation's municipal railways, replacing them with gas-guzzling bus lines, paving the way for global warming and for our energy crisis.

    Morton Mintz

  • Sorel’s People

    In Literary Lives, caricaturist Edward Sorel tells all and then some about giants like Yeats, Proust, Hellman and Jung within the humble frame of a comic strip.

    Richard Lingeman

  • Keeping It Real

    In Songs of Experience, Martin Jay examines modern debates over the relationship between theory and the lived world.

    Jackson Lears

  • Anatomy of a Murder

    Cynthia Carr's Our Town seeks to uncover hidden truths about a 1930 lynching in small-town Indiana. But Carr fails to break the code of silence that many of the town's inhabitants, including her grandparents, took to the grave.

    David Bradley

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