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June 12, 2006 | The Nation

In the Magazine

June 12, 2006

Cover: Cover photo-illustration by Gene Case & Stephen Kling/Avenging Angels

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Peter Dreier explores the Bush Administration's links to the latest mine disaster, William Johnson analyzes the Teamsters, David Bradley reviews Cynthia Carr's new book on the hidden history of a lynching.

Letters

April brought downpours of mail on two subjects: "Can the Left Get Right
With God?
" (April 24), articles on religion by Dan Wakefield, Fr

Editorials

Students for Sensible Drug Policy and the ACLU are challenging a draconian Education Department rule that blocks student drug offenders from receiving federal aid.

The May 20 mine disaster presents more evidence that the Bush Administration places miners in peril with budget cuts, regulatory rollbacks and industry-friendly appointees.

Al Gore is trying to save the world by stirring a nation in denial over global warming to meaningful action. The pity is that this is a job for a former politician, not a current one.

Progressives have sparked courtroom litigation and social protest to focus public attention on Guantánamo. Now the Bush Administration should shut it down.

Columns

TruthDig

Despite the President's denials, connections between Enron's corporate criminals and the Bush family inner circle are are deeply embedded in the policies of two Administrations.

Howl

Declining birthrates in Mexico give the lie to American fears of an influx of immigrants. As birthrates plummet around the world, America's real problem may be a shortage, not a surfeit, of guest workers.

Time magazine's new managing editor has inherited an editorial model that's under siege and a pundit lineup that tilts squarely to the right.

The prosecution of an 8-year-old in New York for wrongful homicide in a school bus accident invokes the "wild child" hysteria of the Central Park jogger case.

Articles

At a memorial service for John Kenneth Galbraith at Harvard University's Memorial Church, economist and biographer Richard Parker eulogized an extraordinary man.

A nearly forgotten criminal conspiracy by GM, Firestone and Chevron shut down the nation's municipal railways, replacing them with gas-guzzling bus lines, paving the way for global warming and for our energy crisis.

The new generation of academics and scholars is challenged to join, elevate and improve the national conversation, and persuade the public to come back to politics.

The X factor in the midterm elections may well be the English language--specifically, the biased terminology that seeps unchallenged into mainstream media political coverage.

The massive immigrant rights protests drew participants via
technology-driven organizing, from text messaging to social networks
like MySpace. Is this the shape of political campaigns to come?

A strong Teamsters union is a powerful weapon in the fight for all working people. But the Teamsters need to rebuild their own house before they can rebuild labor's.

Former Heisman trophy winner and ganja-smoking peacenik Ricky Williams is
contemplating the sweet life in the Canadian Football League. Here's
hoping he finds it.

In Literary Lives, caricaturist Edward Sorel tells all and then
some about giants like Yeats, Proust, Hellman and Jung within the
humble frame of a comic strip.

Why does the FBI find it necessary to spy on Portand's City Council?

Colombia's subtly demagogic President Uribe gained the advantage in the upcoming election by leveraging the strength of anti-left paramilitaries, drug trafficking and a culture of violence.

Cindy Sheehan is more a symbol of the peace movement than its leader, a unifying force who seeks to bridge divisions among those who seek an end to war.

Books & the Arts

Book

In Songs of Experience, Martin Jay examines modern debates over the relationship between theory and the lived world.

Book

Cynthia Carr's Our Town seeks to uncover hidden truths about a 1930 lynching in small-town Indiana. But Carr fails to break the code of silence that many of the town's inhabitants, including her grandparents, took to the grave.