Quantcast

July 17, 2006 | The Nation

In the Magazine

July 17, 2006

Cover: Cover by Gene Case & Stephen Kling/Avenging Angels

Browse Selections From Recent Years

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

Alexander Cockburn diagnoses global capitalism, David Bacon analyzes the Mexican presidential race, Stuart Klawans reviews two new films.

Letters

MORE DIEBOLD VOTE FIXERS

Los Angeles

Editorials

A movement is growing that aims to build a politics of decency and
sanity, which speaks to the generosity of the American people. It's not going to be easy, but it's time to rock the boat.

Here's a salute to America's true patriots: librarians on the frontlines of free inquiry, the Bill of Rights Defense Committee and peace activists across the nation.

The Supreme Court's Hamdan v. Rumsfeld decision is to Bush what the Pentagon Papers were to Nixon: a devastating rebuke of a President who thought he had a blank check and a clear affirmation of human rights and the rule of law.

The winner of the first-ever Nation Student Writing Contest.

In 1963 a handful of distinguished literary intellectuals launched The
New York Review of Books
as an antidote to the lackluster prose and
middlebrow sensibility of the New York Times

Life remains cheap in the coalfields of Appalachia because of the Bush Administration's incompetence and neglect in the face of human and environmental tragedy.

Did the New York Times violate the Espionage Act by publishing reports of government secret spying program? A controversial essay in Commentary has provided intellectual ammunition to chill, censor and punish the press.

If teenagers can't figure out how to participate meaningfully
in politics, they will have lost their voice, impact and power.

Few of us can now imagine a world without freshwater, but look to the
future, when the scarcity of this most basic commodity will profoundly
change our lives.

By adopting the principles of natural capitalism, America can regain its sanity and reverse the reckless use, overuse, waste and destruction of our natural resources.

"I dream of the day that our children will turn the pages of history
books and look to my generation, who said no to the horrors of war
and chose nonviolence over nonexistence."

Rather than let pundits guide our public policy debates, citizens must
seize the initiative and join the conversation.

Columns

TruthDig

If Tricky Dick could tame the grizzled Mao, then certainly Bush
could butter up Kim Jong Il with some of that frat boy charm. Who
knows, Dearest Leader might even join Bush's shaky "coalition of the willing."

Howl

What Warren Buffett's gift of billions to the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation lacks in imagination, it makes up for in safety. If only they had the guts to tackle the real problems.

TruthDig

Democrats should take a page from the GOP playbook and back candidates willing to stand up for their values, rather than wasting their money, time and votes on those who won't.

Music

Antifeminists engage in moral discourse while feminists tend to speak in the language of personal choice. But what happens when choice is a bad idea--for yourself, other women or society?

As we head into Summer 2006, the world capitalist system is out of control.

For once, the President tells the truth.

Articles

The US "war on terror" now extends to an unlikely frontier in Paraguay,
where farmers are caught in the crossfire and human rights groups are
skeptical of the threat posed by Islamic terrorists.

If there is any message to be gleaned from the World Cup, it is
that soccer has finally shed its freight of machismo and anguish,
attracting a global audience of fans who simply want to have fun.

The disputed presidential election has fractured Mexico's political
landscape, pitting leftists against conservatives and the affluent
against an indignant Indian and mestizo underclass.

Bolstered by a Supreme Court ruling that rebuked the Bush
Administration's excessive exercise of power, Lieut. Ehren Watada's
pending court-martial could help restore the rule of law and
energize a popular movement to end an illegal war.

Israel's attacks on Gaza--and now Lebanon-- to intimidate a civilian population for political ends is the very definition of state terrorism.

A Quaker activist explains why the war in Iraq is not only illegal, but morally indefensible.

As New Jersey government plunges into fiscal and constitutional crisis over a proposed sales tax, lawmakers must stop playing politics with the public good and get serious about producing a realistic budget.

Memories of a stolen 1988 election cloud the political landscape, as voters await results of the disputed presidential election.

Peace sentiments are rising among the American public and even in
the much-divided Democrats. What does this mean for electoral politics
and for the course of a war that seems to have no end in sight?

By blindly accepting Bush's expansion of state secrets claims, the
courts are allowing the executive branch to operate above the law,
putting the core principles of our democracy at risk.

Progressives can take a lesson from the success of "How Would a Patriot Act?" Mobilize the liberal blogosphere and take an obscure book for a ride on the bestseller list.

This summer marks a grim anniversary of a Supreme Court decision to
affirm the death penalty and create a bureaucratic killing machine that
puts American justice at odds with the Constitution's underlying
values.

On July 2, Mexico will choose a new president. Whoever wins will face an ongoing labor movement challenging the neoliberal policies of the past.

Elections are decided by message, money and mobilization. The Democrats' choice of tactics for the latter may determine not only the outcome of the '06 elections but the party's future.

Ohio is the bellwether for the nation's electoral health and the prognosis is bad. Error-ridden e-voting, draconian restrictions and widespread incompetence could cause another November breakdown.

Books & the Arts

Book

American foreign policy is shaped by a myth of national righteousness. In two new books, Peter Beinart abuses history to suggest liberals embrace this myth, while Stephen Kinzer uses America's history of involvement in foreign coups to reveal why we cannot.

Film

A hallucinatory mix of animation and live action creates the Orwellian world of A Scanner Darkly; substance triumphs over style in Excellent Cadavers, a Mafia-busting documentary.

Art

In the late '60's, Eva Hesse's ambitious sculptures challenged the art world. Collected in a new exhibition, her art is even greater today.

Book

George Hutchinson's new biography of the mystery woman of the Harlem Renaissance reconsiders both Nella Larsen and a key moment of black cultural history.