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July 10, 2006 | The Nation

In the Magazine

July 10, 2006

Cover: Cover by Gene Case & Stephen Kling/Avenging Angels

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Ira Glasser looks at racial inequities of drug busts, Richard Kim assesses the global impact of AIDS activists, David Yaffe listens to the music of Andrew Hill.

Letters

SECOND THAT EMOTION

Pittsburgh

Editorials

No President in living memory is as overtly religious as George W. Bush. But just how well have the President and his henchmen kept the commandments?

As CEO of Halliburton, Dick Cheney was not much different from other
corporate titans ensnared by accusations of incompetence and fraud.

HOLD THE PHONE COMPANIES

If the United Nations is to keep its promise to grant people with AIDS universal
access to treatment by 2010, it will be because activists are holding
world leaders accountable.

"Vote Blue, Go Green" is the new slogan of Britain's Conservative
Party, a measure of just how great a concern climate change is becoming
to politicians of all stripes.

Americans know it's time to end the US presence in Iraq. They will
reward the party that offers a plan for leaving before more American
soldiers--and countless Iraqis--are killed.

Columns

TruthDig

The Bush Administration's jihad against newspapers that reported on a secret program to monitor the personal-banking records of unsuspecting citizens is more important than the original story.

Howl

Back in Washington's day, Congress printed money to fight the Revolutionary War without collecting taxes to back it up--and paid the price in inflation: History repeats itself today.

Abu Musab al-Zarqawi was a really bad guy. But the Bush
Administration's armchair warriors mythologized him into a
self-fulfilling prophecy of insurgent terror.

Celebrating the death of Zarqawi, the President puts his spin on the
truth.

Articles

Selection of a new UN Secretary General is too important to be
engineered by the whims and prejudices of John Bolton. It's time for
saner voices in the Administration to tell the UN ambassador his time is up.

California's juvenile justice system is broken everywhere you look. An ambitious plan for reform could bring much-needed improvements, but does it go far enough?

Native American activists are braced for a tense summer, as a motorcycling entrepreneur goes forward with plans for a resort that will draw hundreds of thousands of bikers to the sacred site of Bear Butte.

Right-wing nutcase Bernard Goldberg may think he has a lock on who's messing up the Republic, but consider Dan Brown, Joe Franklin, Tucker Carlson...

The drug war is the heir to Jim Crow: a form of widespread, legalized
discrimination.

The hidden toll the Iraq War is exposed in a photo essay on how one mother braces for her son's second deployment to Iraq.

Prison rape is not a dirty joke; it's one of the most frequent and
widespread human rights abuses in America.

The unfolding conflict over US plans to build missile defense components near post-Soviet Russia, in Poland and the Czech Republic, is the latest proof of the way US-Russian relations are deteriorating into a new cold war.

Books & the Arts

Book

John Updike's Terrorist rips its plot from the headlines.
But the book's Irish-Egyptian protagonist is paper-thin, and its jihad-lit plot
remains stubbornly inanimate, devoid of passion or fury.

Music

To honor Andrew Hill's passing, we are reposting an article about his life's achievements originally posted in July, 2006.

Book

In Elaine Feinstein's new biography, the complicated life of Russian
poet Anna Akhmatova is flattened into a fable of suffering and
redemption.