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February 7, 2005 | The Nation

In the Magazine

February 7, 2005

Cover:

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2004

Jonathan Schell knows what is wrong with torture, Rick Perlstein unveils the DLC's tactics and Stuart Klawans reviews "Assault on Precinct 13."

Letters


IS AL QAEDA JUST A BUSH BOOGEYMAN?
by Robert Scheer

Bellingham, Wa.

Editorials

Click here for info on how you can help oppose Gonzalez's nomination.

CAN CBS EVER BE SORRY ENOUGH?

In December the leaders of the Democratic Leadership Council, Al From and Bruce Reed, published an op-ed in the Wall Street Journal about what the Democrats had to do to attract heartland

In February 1917 bread riots, led by women, many of them elderly, broke out in the center of St. Petersburg.

In the run-up to the January 30 election in Iraq, the prospects for a fair and credible outcome have steadily diminished.

How the upper one-one-hundredth of 1 percent does politics.

Columns

scheer

As a political marketing device, Bush's address was brilliant.

Music

Can a dose of Christianity stiffen the Democrats' spine, win back Kansas and bring people power to the anemic left?

Imagine, in the same month as the death of the muse of high camp, Susan Sontag, we have England in an uproar about Prince Harry and his silly armband.

The mushroom-shaped cloud Condi spun
As being the next smoking gun
Was hooey invented to show
Attacking Iraq's apropos.

Articles

A forum on the juvenile death penalty.

Companies try to discredit the experts.

Is Ole Miss Our Future?

As elections near, guerrillas are conducting their own "shock and awe" campaign.

Books & the Arts

Film

Half a century has passed since Manny Farber wrote in these pages about underground films, by which he meant the urban crime movies watched by male loiterers near the Greyhound station, in theate

Book

"I am very happy to see so many flowers here and that is why I want to remind you that flowers, by themselves, have no power whatsoever, other than the power of men and women who protect them and

Book

Alberto Gonzales's nomination to succeed John Ashcroft as Attorney General put the Abu Ghraib torture scandal back on the front pages, since he was directly implicated, as White House counsel, in