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February 23, 2004 | The Nation

In the Magazine

February 23, 2004

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Christian Parenti spends time with Iraqi resistance fighters, William Greider offers three questions for John Kerry and Michael Lind explores the history of the neocons.

Letters


DEMOCRATIC BUSINESS AS USUAL

Portland, ME


Letty Cottin Pogrebin's "In Defense of the Law of Return" [Dec.

Editorials

The demise of Lieberman's campaign should represent the end of the line for the DLC.

John Edwards offers a real program of democratic renewal.

Meteorologists may disagree, but the political weather in Britain almost always comes from the United States.

Nothing stirs Democrats' anger like the fearmongering rhetoric Bush/Cheney employed on the march to war.

"Oh, this is the guy who is supposed to get it," Pam Earle-Benbow said as John Kerry addressed a candidate forum that drew several thousand advocates for low-income families to the Township Audit

George W. Bush's budget is a true lie.

How far can George W. Bush and his White House team go? On the two biggest issues facing them--the war and the budget--there is no end to their disregard for the truth.

Columns

scheer

Is it just me, or is President Bush's demeanor a bit Napoleonic these days?

True democracy could still come to Iraq.

Apparently to McNamara's mortification, Errol Morris, whose film The Fog of War I discussed in my last column here, passes over his subject's thirteen-year stint running the World Bank, wh

...Why the United States Invaded and Occupied Another Country Without Provocation, George W. Bush Offers History His Version of 'Remember the Maine!'

Articles

The Bush Administration's apparent motto: "Leave no defense contractor behind."

If only they are bold enough, Democrats can win on their own wedge issues.

Research support for this article was provided by the Investigative Fund of the Nation Institute.

Books & the Arts

Book

Most Americans take their system of government for granted, as if Moses himself had delivered the Constitution engraved on marble tablets.

Book

About a decade ago, I invented a game with a colleague of mine who, like me, had once worked for Irving Kristol. We called it neoconservative bingo.