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December 30, 2002 | The Nation

In the Magazine

December 30, 2002

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Mark Green decries the evil of access, Kim Phillips-Fein looks for a new New Deal and George Packer reviews Dinesh D'Souza.

Editorials

The same week that New York City Mayor Mike Bloomberg announced his
plans to close eight city firehouses, Mike Wallace, John Jay College
professor and bard of New York, held a conference on "Ne

Among the obscenities accumulating in the political atmosphere, the most
disgusting may be Trent Lott.

A sense of the larger picture is growing among US citizens, notably,
though not only, among a young generation, along with a revulsion
against official and corporate contempt for the will and w

For a brief moment one could almost believe that the US march toward war
with Iraq had paused.

It seemed like a straightforward invitation. Dinner at an upscale uptown
restaurant, sponsored by a drug company, where the topic was to be
financial planning.

It's still the economy, stupid. The President gets it.

Columns

Napoleon would sketch out in an afternoon the new constitution and legal
arrangements for one of France's imperial conquests.

So Elliott Abrams (the felon) is back,
And Poindexter's now a big cheese.
High-level appointments now favor the guys
With rap sheets instead of CVs.

When I was in college, I joined a court-watching project in Roxbury,
Massachusetts. We observed criminal trials, then interviewed judges,
lawyers and witnesses.

Articles

For more from Hiro on Iraq, read Iraq: In the Eye of the Storm, a short, lucid primer recently published by NationBooks.

Minnesota's Dean Barkley represents a movement with a strong state foothold.

Campaign finance reform can succeed--but only if the pressure stays on.

When plants in Nebraska carrying swine diarrhea drugs mingled with food for humans, all hell broke loose.

Their support of Democrats declined in 2002, helping to sink the party's fortunes.

Books & the Arts

Book

Recently, while doing some research into social conditions in the early twentieth century, I came across a reference to Looking Backward, written in 1888.

Book

Last year marked the "twentieth anniversary" of AIDS, a grim occasion, to say the least, that put major US newspapers in an unenviable predicament.

Book

Frederick Seidel of St. Louis, Missouri, is probably the last American decadent--certainly he is the most distinguished.

Theater

The great disparity in the critical reaction to Caryl Churchill's Far Away, now playing Off Broadway, serves to remind us that opinions are just that--neither right nor wrong, but rather we

Book

Dinesh D'Souza became a right-wing campus radical at Dartmouth in the late Carter years. His motives should be recognizable to former campus radicals of the other variety.