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December 10, 2007 | The Nation

In the Magazine

December 10, 2007

Cover: Cover art and illustration by Doug Chayka; design by Gene Case & Stephen Kling/Avenging Angels

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Matt Weiland on Philip Roth, Harry Maurer on Studs Terkel, Ruth Scurr on France.

Letters

ALBERT SHANKER'S UFT

New Haven, Conn.

Editorials

My name is Annabelle, and I love paying taxes.

The technology exists to solve environmental problems and improve our standard of living.

A nation divided over national security; the return of the Winter Soldier.

For Studs Terkel, the touchstone is memory and speech the stuff of which his art is made.

I will not pay my income tax if we go to war with Iran. Neither should you.

The debate in New York State over driver's licenses for undocumented immigrants became a proxy for the unsettled issue of immigration reform.

When Franklin Delano Roosevelt was President, my father knew he had a friend in the White House. We should rekindle that spirit today.

Norman Podhoretz and Daniel Pipes consider how the newly elected President should proceed in the world arena. The first act of a five-act play.

Columns

Howl

Conservation, like taxes, is for little people. When you're rich you can waste all the water you want.

TruthDig

Their boy Nawaz Sharif's back in Pakistan, oil prices are soaring and the Bushies continue to do their bidding.

Barry Bonds makes an enticing target. But the DOJ should also focus on steroid enablers, like a certain team owner who now lives in the White House.

At the Las Vegas Democratic debate, CNN Anchors Blitzer and Malvaux twisted legitimate questions into "gotcha" traps. There's gotta be a better way.

Articles

Thanks to globalization, the 'Islamic bomb' turns out to be a little bit American, Canadian, Swiss, German, Dutch, British, Japanese and even Russian.

Massive floods cause widespread devastation; while other nations rush in with aid, Mexico's closest neighbor has barely responded.

He's greener and less hawkish than his predecessor, but is Australia's next prime minister really all that different?

Today's military members face red tape, false advertising and multiple deployments. What happened to the promises of the original GI Bill?

As the strike continues, Writers Guild members have turned the Internet into an organizing tool.

Books & the Arts

Book

Nureyev: The Life brings new focus to an iconic figure of modern ballet.

Book

Philip Roth's Exit Ghost considers whether we're astonished by death or the life that precedes it.

During a Vietnam War protest, Norman Mailer blustered and banged a generation's experience through his prodigious ego.

Art

Museums can't get enough of Kara Walker, whose silhouettes of the history of slavery seem to be a nightmare she's trying to enjoy.

Book

Richard Rhodes's Arsenals of Folly, sequel to the book that defined the atomic age, captures the political struggle that brought it to an end.

Book

Gangsters have guns and muscle, but a good writer always gets the last word.

Book

A mosaic of anecdotes and historical snapshots surveys the sociological diversity of France, past and present.

Book

A new book examines headscarf hysteria and the politics of identity in contemporary France.

Book

Two new books seek to galvanize progressives at a key political moment: Paul Krugman's The Conscience of a Liberal and Jonathan Chait's The Big Con.

Poetry

 A new name remembering
  thirteen dead was on the box.
One of seven sets of twins to

3rd Party Article

Today's youth activism is better than that of the '60s. Too bad one young journalist doesn't get it.