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August 4, 2003 | The Nation

In the Magazine

August 4, 2003

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Arthur Miller fears for Israel's future, Jeff Faux explores NAFTA's effect and Liza Featherstone talks to students about politics.

Letters


DUBYA-SPEAK: MEAN & MEANER

Carmel Valley, Calif.

Editorials

The United States seems to interpret the news these days through a prism
of catch phrases borrowed from history.

Three years ago the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) lost its
seventy-one-year grip on Mexico's presidency.

In late June, George W. Bush spoke of Africa as a famine-stricken
continent where the people are unable to grow enough food for
themselves.

George W. Bush's recent tour of Africa was a series of campaign photo
opportunities dressed up as a diplomatic trip.

Did senior Bush officials blow the cover of a US intelligence officer
working covertly in a field of vital importance to national
security--and break the law--in order to strike at a Bush Admin

Peter Davis is on assignment in Iraq for The Nation.

The test of a great nation is whether it has the capacity to own up to
its mistakes and change course for the sake of the country and the
world.

Columns

scheer

Even censored, 9/11 report shows the focus was on the wrong nation.

scheer

In England, they're shooting the messengers--and at least one man is dead already.

Stop the Presses

If you want to read everything The Nation has ever published on George W. Bush, click here for information on how to acquire individual access to The Nation Digital Archive.

Music

If you want to read everything The Nation has ever published on abortion rights, click here for information on how to acquire individual access to The Nation Digital Archive.

Aha! So Tenet is the guy
Responsible for Bush's lie
About the Niger A-bomb deal
That from the start was quite unreal.
The Niger lie's off Tenet's chest.

Articles

The 9/11 report is an indictment of the intelligence agencies as well as the administrations that oversaw them.

The US may have won the war, but US companies are in danger of losing the peace.

The Senegalese capital Dakar was put on lockdown mode for Bush's recent visit.

Despite threats of violence, volunteers from around the world have arrived in the occupied territories for Freedom Summer.

Collateral damage mounts in Bush's ideological war on the welfare state.

Without it, no state can endure as a representative of the Jewish
nature.

The Administration appears to be bent on teaching liberal states a lesson.

Once they snubbed "Republicrats"; now they're set to oust Bush by any
means.

From MoveOn to meetup.com, the net is facilitating a new citizen
insurgency.

Books & the Arts

Book

I've been bashfully mute amidst the chatter over Norman Rush's new novel, Mortals, because he wasn't on the modest list of Writers I Know About.

Film

It's always good fun to see a boy wax romantic over the first girl to
give him a handjob--and if the boy should be a black-hatted Jew, the fun
is only improved.

Book

In 1890 the American feminist Charlotte Perkins Gilman wrote a
remarkable short story, "The Yellow Wallpaper," about a woman--genteel,
educated, with more than a casual taste for intellectual l

Book

Helen Keller may be the world's most famous supercrip.

Book

Justice Sandra Day O'Connor's new book, The Majesty of the Law,
appears at a particularly auspicious moment. As the swing vote on and
author of Grutter v.

Book

Publishers, even academic presses, know that the public likes biography
and cater to this taste with a stream of handsomely produced, and often
quite well-written, volumes.