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April 14, 2003 Issue

  • Features

    Assault on Diversity

    On April 1 the Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in the University of Michigan affirmative action cases on whether to overturn the 1978 Bakke decision and ban consideration of race as

    Alfred Ross and Lee Cokorinos

  • Stanford U. and the Bush Administration

    As student antiwar activists work to make their case against war persuasive to ambivalent classmates, the leaders of a Stanford University peace group have launched a different kind of campaign--

    Emily Biuso

  • Dispatch From India

    The Indian public has long been suspicious of the US arguments for military action against Iraq and the legitimacy of any "regime change" executed by a superpower with imperial ambitions.

    Praful Bidwai

  • Dispatch From Britain

    The night the war began, an ashen-faced woman in Parliament Square held up a photograph of an Iraqi soldier, reduced to a smudge of carbon but for his head and feet--an image from the last Gulf

    Maria Margaronis

  • Dispatch From Mexico

    "We have come to give flowers instead of missiles," a flower producer repeated, as he gave roses to the passers-by in the main square of Mexico City on Friday morning, hours after the US attack

    Tania Molina Ramírez

  • Dispatch From Vietnam

    In this country, where a US military attack echoes more loudly perhaps than anywhere else in the world, protesters against the war are expressing themselves from Hanoi in the north to central V

    Peter Davis

  • Dispatch From Germany

    I came across a sign the other day, inelegantly scrawled on cardboard and stuck to a telephone pole. It read Fuck Bush.

    Paul Hockenos

  • Dispatch From Russia

    A few hours after the United States launched its first missile attack against Baghdad, I spoke to 400 students and faculty at Moscow's largest university of commerce and economics.

    Katrina vanden Heuvel

  • Letter to America

    Dear America:

    This is a difficult letter to write, because I'm no longer sure who you are. Some of you may be having the same trouble.

    Margaret Atwood

  • Dispatch From France

    Following the first attack at 3 am French time, the morning papers were ready with generic "War Is Here" headlines, accompanied by full-page images of dark skies.

    Mark Cramer

  • Dispatch From Spain

    The Spanish capital took on the air of a battle zone the weekend after the war began, as antiwar protesters clashed with riot police throughout the city.

    Samuel Loewenberg

  • Dispatch From China

    The pedicab driver stretched out in the passenger seat, his legs thrown over the bicycle seat, half dozing and half listening to the latest news updates in the hours after America began its mis

    Jen Lin-Liu

  • Dispatch From Israel

    As I was driving home from work late Wednesday night, it became clear that the assault would begin within hours.

    Neve Gordon

  • Dispatch From Philippines

    Walden Bello was in Baghdad March 14-17 as a member of the Asian Peace Mission, a delegation of parliamentarians and members of civil society from different countries in Asia.

    Walden Bello

  • Dispatch From Jordan

    The shockingly awful Anglo-American invasion of Iraq means that Jordan is now literally situated between two wars: To the west, the increasingly bloody Israeli-Palestinian confrontation is now

    Mouin Rabbani

  • Dispatch From Egypt

    My neighbor, who like many Egyptians prefers not to see his name in print, asked me about my nationality the morning the war broke out. "French?" he inquired hopefully. American, I told him.

    Steve Negus

  • Dispatch From Nigeria

    The gym is the last place to look for an impassioned discussion of global politics in Nigeria, a country that is currently pre-occupied with gasoline scarcity, rising political and ethnic viole

    Waziri Adio

  • Editorials

    The Rockets’ Red Glare

    The fierce tableau of smoke and flames that US bombs created over Baghdad--a visual message of America's awesomely destructive power--brought to mind Shelley's meditation on an ancient ruin, wh

    the Editors

  • With the Kurds

    I'm standing at the northern front in Chamchamal, a quarter-mile from Saddam Hussein's hilltop divisions. Before me six mounds of earth, like oversized anthills, line the ridge.

    Eliza Griswold

  • The Road to Peace

    Many pundits predicted that the peace movement would dry up once war began, and indeed polls show that American support for the war rose to as high as 71 percent after its launch.

    Liza Featherstone

  • Shocks to the Constitution

    Spring officially began on Thursday, March 20, but the first real spring day in Washington was Saturday, a blindingly sunny day, flowers just beginning to peek out, the National Kite Festival o

    David Cole

  • Bush and God

    Not since Jimmy Carter's confession that he had lusted in his heart after women other than his wife have Americans been so interested in the religious life of the man occupying the Oval Office.

    Randall Balmer

  • CNN–War Casualty

    You could have knocked CNN's Aaron Brown over with a feather.

    Susan J. Douglas

  • On White Preferences

    The Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in the University of Michigan affirmative action cases on April 1.

    Jay Rosner

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  • Books and the Arts

    To the Unfinished

    Clear eminence without whom I would be
    nothing oh great provision never seen
    barely acknowledged even wished away

    W.S. Merwin

  • The Tragedy of William O. Douglas

    William O. Douglas was a judicial record-setter.

    David J. Garrow

  • A Stone Unturned

    Someone once described Graham Greene as the novelist of decolonizing Britain.

    Patrick Smith

  • Respectfully Yours

    Richard Sennett is best known in the United States for his 1972 book (written with Jonathan Cobb), The Hidden Injuries of Class. That study of white working-class men, how they understoo

    Linda Gordon

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