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Diary of a Mad Law Professor | The Nation

Diary of a Mad Law Professor

Patricia Williams

The digital environs of Facebook and MySpace are ruled by assortive
principles and the misplaced faith that an actuarial table is any kind
of community--beloved, political or otherwise.

In a New York courtroom, a jury must decide whether a hip-hop-loving young white man who beat a young black man with a baseball bat is guilty of assault or a hate crime.

The prosecution of an 8-year-old in New York for wrongful homicide in a school bus accident invokes the "wild child" hysteria of the Central Park jogger case.

Why is it that We the People are so obsessed with whether singing our national anthem in Spanish is an affront to our union?

Bush's goofily unmoored positioning of himself as "the decider" duncifies us all.

Martians visiting planet Earth are mystified by the racist ruckus over
Representative Cynthia McKinney's hair.

The real world is becoming more like a computer game every day. I worry that the computer itself is breeding little cyberhumans who will wander among us, sucking the humanity out of our ears.

OK, kids: With conservatives on the hunt for dangerous left-wing academics, take this SAT (Save America from Treachery) test. See if you can tell the difference between a terrorist and a truth-teller. First prize: A three-day getaway in Baghdad. Fail and go to jail.

Author

Patricia J. Williams
Patricia J. Williams, a professor of law at Columbia University, was born in...

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