Quantcast

The Nation

September 13, 2007
John Nichols
John Nichols

We now learn that General David Petraeus fancies himself a Dwight Eisenhower for the 21st century.

According to a report in London's Independent newspaper by the reliable Middle East observer Patrick Cockburn, the U.S. military viceroy in Iraq would like very much to return from his mission and -- like the Supreme Commander of Allied forces in Europe during World War II and of North Atlantic Treaty Organization in its aftermath -- mount a bid for the White House.

Petraeus has apparently been so open in expressing his "long-term interest in running for the US presidency" that Sabah Khadim, a former senior adviser at Iraq's Interior Ministry who worked closely with the general in Baghdad, recalls, "I asked him if he was planning to run in 2008 and he said, 'No, that would be too soon'."

226
John Nichols
17393
September 13, 2007
Ari Berman
Ari Berman

Written by Matthew Blake:

Back in July, support for the war in Iraq was at an all-time low, with prominent Republican Senators like Richard Lugar of Indiana and Pete Domenici of New Mexico advocating the need for an exit strategy. But then, as the New York Times notes Thursday, the White House unveiled a new campaign to sell the surge.

Key enlistees in this PR effort were Brookings Institution Senior Fellows Michael O'Hanlon and Ken Pollack. Their July 30 New York Times op-ed ("A War We Just Might Win") and endless parade of subsequent public appearances supposedly lent credibility to the idea that US military commander David Petraeus (who invited his old Princeton buddy O'Hanlon over for a visit) was winning over Iraqis, leading to region-by-region improvements and an overall decrease in violence.

43
The Notion
17392
September 13, 2007
David Corn

In the aftermath of General David Petraeus' stay-the-course presentation to Congress and as George W. Bush prepared yet another major speech-to-the-nation o...

104
156349
September 13, 2007
Karen Houppert

I live in Baltimore, Maryland.

At the moment, that is slightly more dangerous than being an American soldier in Afghanistan.

In Afganhistan, just over eighty US soldiers have been killed so far this year. In Baltimore, we're up to 215 murders in 2007.

46
The Notion
17391
September 12, 2007
John Nichols
John Nichols

Less than a month ago, on August 19, 2007, The New York Times published a letter from seven U.S. soldiers who wrote the newspaper as they were finishing a 15-month deployment in Iraq.

The letter contradicted claims about the supposedly improving character of the occupation that was already being circulated by General David Petraeus and his aides in anticipation of the U.S. commander in Iraq's testimony this week to Congress.

No, wrote the soldiers, they were not greeted in Iraq as the "liberators" Vice President Dick Cheney imagined four years ago. Rather, they said, they had came to recognize their presence as that of "an occupying force that long ago outlived its reluctant welcome."

234
John Nichols
17390
September 12, 2007
Katrina vanden Heuvel

With nine million children uninsured in the US, and George Bush preparing to veto a bipartisan effort to cover four to five million of them, it's clear how far we are from a universal health care system that would benefit the roughly 50 million uninsured Americans, the tens of millions of underinsured, and the millions of "fully insured" who get the shaft when the time comes for Big Insurance to come through for them.

With that in mind, it was great to see Michael Moore call on the presidential candidates to Take the Sherrod Brown Pledge. Ten years ago, Moore writes, Brown "pledged not to accept his free government health care until everyone in the United States had the same luxury. (He's still waiting.)"

To the best of my knowledge, no presidential candidate has taken Moore up on this challenge. You can contact their campaigns about the Pledge here and also suggest that the candidates lend their support to HR-676 co-authored by presidential candidate, Representative Dennis Kucinich (who might not be taking the Pledge himself but has certainly been working for years for a real, single-payer system). HR-676 would create a single-payer healthcare system by expanding Medicare to every resident. (A system favored by a majority of Americans even if it would require higher taxes.)

138
17389
September 12, 2007
Ari Berman
Ari Berman

This email from Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell just hit my inbox: "This Nation Needs A New Attorney General, And It Can't Afford To Wait."

The subhead below read: "Democrats Who Asked For New Leadership Will Soon Have The Opportunity To Expeditiously Confirm A New Attorney General."

In other words, get ready for an announcement--soon--of a new Attorney General.

94
The Notion
17388
September 11, 2007
David Corn

Did General David Petraeus today suggest that the war in Iraq may not make the United States safer?

During his second day of appearances on Capitol ...

168
156348
September 11, 2007
Peter Rothberg
Peter Rothberg

For an update on the Jena 6 case read my colleague Mark Sorkin's new exclusive online report.

I've been meaning to write about the Jena 6 since I first heard the shocking details of what sounds like a story from the Jim Crow-era South. But the lives of six black high school students--accused of beating up a white classmate after a series of racial incidents at a high school in the small Louisiana town--are being ruined today in Jena, Louisiana in a case that simply boggles the mind.

The trouble started when one black student, after requesting and receiving permission from the school administration, decided to sit under a shade tree traditionally used by white students. In response, white students hung three nooses from the tree. That act -- a throwback to the days when blacks were lynched for exercising their civil rights -- was portrayed by school officials as a "silly prank," and the white students got off with a slap on the wrist.

68
17387