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The Nation

July 11, 2007
William Greider
William Greider

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has demonstrated admirable shrewdness in the fight she provoked with her own Democrats over approving new trade agreements for George W. Bush. She backed off.

The conflict is not entirely settled yet, but Pelosi wisely decided to defuse the intense anger in the Democratic caucus rather than try to bull through it. In pursuit of unity, she has shown respect for the new folks elected last fall and other rank-and-file Democrats determined to challenge the free-trade status quo and to change it. That is good for them. And good for her.

The surest sign Pelosi is moving in the right direction are the hostile rebukes from the Wall Street Journal and Washington Post. "Trade Double-Cross," said the headline on the Journal's editorial. "House Democrats go protectionist." This is nonsense, but typical of the Journal's slanderous style. Pelosi is demeaned as a pawn of organized labor and lefty extremists. Makes you wonder if the doctrinaire right-wing Journal could get any worse with Rupert Murdoch as the owner.

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July 11, 2007
John Nichols
John Nichols

As the most sensible moderate member of the Senate Republican Caucus, Maine's Olympia Snowe should have been on board long ago for a strict timeline to bring the troops home from the senseless war in Iraq.Instead, for months, she played the current Republican game of complaining bitterly about the war while eschewing the tough votes to bring it to a conclusion. As recently as May, when Senator Russ Feingold, D-Wisconsin, and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nevada, were pushing the Senate to endorse a genuine exit strategy, Snowe joined centrist Senator Evan Bayh, D-Indiana, in proposing a murky plan that was designed to give the Iraq government more time to meet benchmarks before getting serious about a withdrawal strategy.

Now, however, as it becomes clear that benchmarks aren't being met and that President Bush's "surge" strategy is only getting more Americans and Iraqis killed, Snowe has finally come around to the place where she should have been all along.

With a Senate vote expected next week on a proposal by Democrats Carl Levin of Michigan and Jack Reed of Rhode Island to begin a troop withdrawal from Iraq within 120 days and to complete the extraction by next April, Snowe is signaling that she plans to vote with the vast majority of Senate Democrats in support of the plan.

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July 11, 2007
Katrina vanden Heuvel

Blame Canada

The increasingly isolated President is under siege from allsides. From the right, Republican senators are jumping off hisIraqi bandwagon faster than Leo DiCaprio on the Titanic. From theleft, Democrats are trying to peer past his stonewall ofexecutive privilege.

Abroad, he faces an imploding Middle East. From the Far East,China's economic rise is challenging American political hegemony.He can't build a wall fast or tall enough to stop immigrationfrom the south. And from the north, there has arisen an assertiveand aggressive--wait for this--Canada.

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July 11, 2007
TomDispatch

As the editor of Chalmers Johnson's Blowback Trilogy for the American Empire Project, I was struck by an oddity when the second volume, The Sorrows of Empire: Militarism, Secrecy, and the End of the Republic, was published in 2004 to splendid reviews in this country. Johnson's focus in the book -- its heart and soul, you might say -- was what he called our "empire of bases," the over-700 military bases, giant to micro, that the Pentagon then listed as ours. The book vividly laid out the Pentagon's global basing structure, its "footprint" (to use the term the Defense Department favors), in startling detail.

It was a way of getting at the nature of imperial power for a country that largely avoided colonies, but nonetheless managed to garrison the globe. As a topic, all those bases would have seemed unavoidable in any serious review, no less one praising the book. Yet, somehow, review after review managed not to mention, no less substantively discuss, this crucial aspect of Johnson's thesis. Only recently, all these years later, has a mainstream review appeared in this country that focused on his work on those bases. Jonathan Freedland, reviewing the third volume in Johnson's trilogy, Nemesis: The Last Days of the American Republic, in the New York Review of Books, took up the subject eloquently -- and (wouldn't you know it?), he isn't an American. He works for the British Guardian.

Isn't it strange that we Americans can garrison the planet and yet, in this country, bases are only a topic of discussion when some local U.S. community suddenly hears that it might lose its special base and an uproar ensues. Typically, we have made it through years of war since 2001, during which untold billions of dollars have gone into constructing massive bases in Iraq and Afghanistan, and yet these bases (as well as the planning behind them) have, until recently, gone almost totally unmentioned in all the argument, debate, and uproar over what to do about Iraq.

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July 11, 2007
John Nichols
John Nichols

The frequently ridiculous Dr. Sanjay Gupta and the always ridiculous Wolf Blitzer tried to take apart filmmaker Michael Moore case against the failed U.S. health care system this week on CNN's "The Situation Room."

They lost.

Badly.

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July 11, 2007
John Nichols
John Nichols

Republicans are already facing a lot of trouble going into the 2008 competition for control of the Senate. And, now, they've got a prostitution problem -- invloving Louisiana Senator David "Family Values" Vitter -- that could cost the party another seat.

After losing control of the Senate in 2006, Republicans have to turn around and defend all the seats the party's candidates won in the party's 2002 sweep. With President Bush's approval numbers in the tank, and with the most of the senators tied by their votes to an unpopular war, that won't be easy.

The GOP's got to defend a number of incumbents who are vulnerable because of their closeness to the Bush administration -- Maine's Susan Collins, Minnesota's Norm Coleman, New Hampshire's John Sununu. Several of their "secure" incumbents are suddenly looking less secure because of ethical scandals, including senior senators Ted Stevens of Alaska and New Mexico's Pete Domenici. And their newest senator, Wyoming's John Barrasso, was appointed rather than elected and must face voters in a western state where the Democrats are showing previous unimagined signs of life.

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July 10, 2007
David Corn

In the fall of 1998, David Vitter felt compelled to weigh in on the national debate over the possible impeachment of President Bill Clinton for lying about ...

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July 10, 2007
Ari Berman
Ari Berman

So much for the DC madam's client list not being newsworthy. Tell that to Senator David Vitter, the conservative Louisiana Republican and first major politico linked to Madam Deborah Jane Palfrey.

After the AP reported that his phone number appeared in Palfrey's phone records, Vitter apologized for "a very serious sin in my past for which I am, of course, completely responsible." He continued: "Several years ago, I asked for and received forgiveness from God and my wife in confession and marriage counseling." It was unclear if that was before or after a prominent Louisiana Republican accused Vitter of repeatedly shaking up with a prostitute in New Orleans' French Quarter.

Vitter, in yet another delicious slice of religious right hypocrisy, is one of the most outspoken social conservatives in the Senate. He co-sponsored legislation to federally finance abstinence-only education and called a ban on gay marriage the most important issue in the country today. He also told the New Orleans Times-Picayune that "infidelity, divorce, and deadbeat dads contribute to the breakdown of traditional families."

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July 10, 2007
Katrina vanden Heuvel

When approached by lawyers representing mentally retarded inmates, Bush refused.

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