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The Nation

December 1, 2014
Dave Zirin
Dave Zirin

Five players on the Rams football team made a political stand on Sunday in solidarity with Michael Brown.

Dave Zirin
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November 28, 2014
Dave Zirin
Dave Zirin

The decision by Judge Barbara Jones to reinstate Ray Rice stands as a brutal judgment on NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell.

Dave Zirin
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November 26, 2014
John Nichols
John Nichols

Ferguson teaches us that in elections for local law-enforcement posts the most fundamental choices are made.

John Nichols
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November 26, 2014
Michelle Chen
Michelle Chen

Walmart, Dickies, Disney, Sean John Apparel, Sears: Two years after the Tazreen factory fire, these companies and others have still not compensated the victims who died making their clothes.

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November 26, 2014
Word Salad

A couple of years ago, we put up a thankful post, expressing our deep appreciation for the test-solvers who go over our puzzle before it sees print. Our gratitude hasn’t diminished in the slightest since then—if anything, it’s become even more heartfelt—so with Thanksgiving upon us, it seemed like a good time to thank them all over again.

It’s not an exaggeration to say that without these attentive and exacting collaborators, the Nation puzzle would not be possible. Every week, without fail, they save us from inadvertent errors and lapses of diction, suggest improvements both large and small, and generally add an inviting gloss to our efforts—and they do it without recompense or hesitation. We are indebted to them beyond measure.

Since our last thank-you note, we’ve added a couple of new helpers to the roster. Katherine Bryant, an editor of science books in Cambridge, Massachusetts, is well-known to us through the National Puzzlers’ League, where she was a longtime editor of the monthly puzzle magazine, The Enigma; she can always be counted on to correct any scientific misapprehensions on our part.

Bart Laws, a professor at the Brown University School of Public Health, came to our attention because he was already checking for our errors—only after the fact, when it was too late to save us from embarrassment. After the second time Prof. Laws sent us a correction e-mail, we decided it was time to get him on our team. Happily for us, he accepted.

The other testers, who have remained with us from the beginning of this enterprise are:

• Mark Halpin, the theater designer and puzzlesmith whom we interviewed on the subject of Stephen Sondheim; his own remarkable puzzles can be found here • Sally Picciotto (Henri’s daughter), a dancer and public health researcher • Greg Pliska, a film and TV composer/orchestrator, Broadway music director (War Horse), and puzzlesmith who appears occasionally as puzzle guru on NPR’s Ask Me Another • a group of solvers that meets over breakfast in Berkeley, including Ann Daniels, Jutta Degener, Joe Fendel, Erica Klarreich, Dunn Miller, Barbara Selfridge and Jon Zingman.

And as always, our tireless editors at The Nation, Judith Long and Sandy McCroskey, are an invaluable source of advice and wisdom.

Here are a few examples of how these folks have improved the puzzle just over the past few weeks:

• In Puzzle 3345 we originally clued NYMPH as    Goddess seen in New York unit (5) There was universal pushback on that definition, so “goddess” became “spirit.”

• Puzzle 3343—which, incidentally, was written in direct response to Ms. Long’s plea for a knitting-themed puzzle—included the entry PURLOINED LETTER, which led to a long discussion of whether “letter” in the sense of “one who lets [an apartment]” was better clued by “landlord” or “tenant.” The consensus pointed to “landlord.”

• In Puzzle 3339, we had clued ODIN simply as    God of noise (4) relying on the Irish O’ for “of” (which is attested by Webster’s). The testers unanimously agreed that that was too cute, which is why the clue wound up as God of boundless joy and noise (4)

Naturally, any mistakes that remain in the puzzle are entirely our own. But because of these folks, there are fewer than there would have been otherwise. So: Thank you. (And thanks also to San Francisco Chronicle columnist Jon Carroll, from whom we borrowed the title of this post.)

This week’s clueing challenge: GRATEFUL. To comment (and see other readers’ comments), please click on this post’s title and scroll to the bottom of the resulting screen. And now, four links: • The current puzzle • Our puzzle-solving guidelines | PDF • Our e-books (solve past puzzles on your iOS device—many hints provided by the software! • A Nation puzzle solver’s blog where every one of our clues is explained in detail. This is also where you can post quibbles, questions, kudos or complaints about the current puzzle, as well as ask for hints.

Word Salad
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November 25, 2014
Dave Zirin
Dave Zirin

Black athletes are expressing views across social media about the killing of Michael Brown. It’s past time white athletes took some of this weight. 

Dave Zirin
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November 25, 2014
Dani McClain

Black youth are perceived as adults, and their behaviors criminalized at every turn. Can this moment help change that?

Dani McClain
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November 25, 2014
Katrina vanden Heuvel

When it comes to Ukraine, it’s time for the hawks to stand down.

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November 25, 2014
Oscar Reyes

The developed world has pledged $9.5 billion to help fight climate change. But it’s going to take hundreds of billions more.

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