Quantcast

Take Action | The Nation

  •  
Nation Action

Take Action

Your Guide to Meaningful Action

President Obama: Extend Labor Protections to Homecare Workers

In December of 2011, President Obama announced that his administration would extend federal minimum wage and overtime protections to an estimated 2.5 million homecare workers. More than one year later, the rule changes to the “companionship exemption” of the Fair Labor Standards Act are under final review by the White House Office of Management and Budget. Meanwhile, members of the profitable home healthcare industry are lobbying to keep the status quo.

 TO DO

Sign The Nation's open letter to President Obama imploring him to fulfill his promise and extend minimum wage and overtime protections to homecare workers

 TO READ

This recent editorial in The Hill makes clear how the "companionship exemption" is both deeply archaic and patently unfair. 

 TO WATCH

In this video, Caring Across Generations Co-Director Ai-jen Poo explains how and why her organization is trying to transform long-term care in a way that recognizes everyone's dignity.

On IWD, Protect Funding for VAWA

On March 7, 2013—the day before International Women’s Day—President Obama signed into law the renewal of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), this time with added protections for the LGBT community and immigrant and Native American women. However, budget cuts implemented as part of Congress’s sequestration deal threaten to underfund the program. If the cuts go forward as planned, programs funded by VAWA could lose more than $20 million, potentially leaving 35,927 victims without access to much-needed services.

TO DO

Reports indicate that President Obama and Congress may be working out a deal to end the sequester. This International Women’s Day, tell your representatives that domestic violence victims cannot be used as bargaining chips. Demand that any deal to avert the sequester restores full funding to VAWA programs.

TO READ

This history of IWD in words and images shows the struggles that went into establishing the holiday and how the day has helped galvanize support for a long-term feminist agenda.

TO WATCH

This video captures the journey of women’s rights from 1911 to the present, and key moments of the women’s movements globally.

FAU: Reject the GEO Group

Last week, Florida Atlantic University raised eyebrows when officials announced that they had sold the naming rights to the school’s new football stadium to the GEO Group, the nation’s second-largest private prison company. In response, students occupied President Mary Jane Saunders’s office last week demanding a recision of the agreement given the role private prisons play in US society and the especially egregious record of GEO.

TO DO

Join The Nation in asking FAU President Mary Jane Saunders and the Board of Trustees to reverse their deal with GEO Group.

TO READ

The Nation sports correspondent Dave Zirin recently argued that the student movement opposing the plan to rename the stadium is a high-profile sign of the growing movement against the US system of mass incarceration otherwise known as “the New Jim Crow.”

TO WATCH

This local TV news report details the student occupation and why activists are so exercised over the naming plan.

Take the Pledge to Stand Up for Workers' Rights

March 11 marks the second anniversary of the passage of Wisconsin Act 10, Governor Scott Walker’s legislative assault on public sector unions in his state. To mark the movement that rose against Walker’s agenda, the filmmakers of the documentary We Are Wisconsin have designated March 11 the National Day of Recommitment to the fight for workers’ rights in Wisconsin and around the world.

 TO DO

Sign The Nation’s pledge endorsing the call to “recommit” to workers’ rights. Visit WeAreWisconsinTheFilm.com to find a screening to attend of “We Are Wisconsin” in your neighborhood or use the #3113 resources to organize your own.

 TO READ

The March 4, 2013, issue of The Nation featured a forum on the challenges facing labor in America today with contributors like Richard Kahlenberg of the Century Foundation, Bhairavi Desai of the New York Taxi Workers Alliance and Chicago Teachers Union president Karen Lewis.

 TO WATCH

“We Are Wisconsin” focuses on six people who came together in the winter of 2011 to protest Scott Walker’s assault on workers’ rights.

Support LGBTQ Immigrants

As Congress debates immigration reform, it risks leaving LGBTQ people out in the cold. Currently, immigrants in same-sex couples are not eligible for the same fast-tracked path to a green card afforded to married heterosexual couples. If Congress does not address this injustice, thousands of these families could be separated or forced to leave the country.

 TO DO

Sign The Nation’s open letter to lawmakers urging them to make sure LGBTQ people are included in any immigration reform legislation. Then, lend your support to United We Dream’s “Queer Undocumented Immigrant Project.”

 TO READ

In a recent article in Colorlines, Seth Freed Wessler lays out the barriers facing LGBTQ undocumented immigrants and the possibilities going forward. In a blog post, Aura Bogado reports on Dreamers, including Queer Undocumented Immigrant Project activists, who demonstrated at a House Immigration Hearing in early February.

 TO WATCH

In a video by United We Dream, “Undocuqueer” activists explain their decision to stand up for their rights as undocumented LGBTQ immigrants.

Defend Walmart Warehouse Workers

This past January, the state of California ordered a Walmart-contracted warehouse complex in Chino, California, to pay 865 employees up to $1.1 million in stolen wages. The company denied the charges and is appealing the ruling. In response, Warehouse Workers United has started a campaign urging Walmart to enforce its own “Standards for Suppliers.”

 TO DO

Use The Nation’s activism tool to implore Walmart CEO Mike Duke to stand with the Walmart warehouse workers in Chino. Then head to WarehouseWorkersUnited.org and add your name to their petition

 TO READ

In the January 7-14, 2013 issue of The Nation, Josh Eidelson reported that new approaches to organizing—including the inclusion of workers from Walmart-suppliers like the warehouse in Chino—could represent unprecedented opportunities to force the world’s biggest retailer to change its ways.

 TO WATCH

This past November, the Center for Public Integrity and the Center for Investigative Reporting produced a video on the fight to hold Walmart accountable for wage theft at one of its suppliers in Mira Loma, California.

A weekly guide to meaningful action, this blog connects readers with resources to channel the outrage so many feel after reading about abuses of power and privilege. Far from a comprehensive digest of all worthy groups working on behalf of the social good, Take Action seeks to shine a bright light on one concrete step that Nation readers can take each week. To broaden the conversation, we’ll publish a weekly follow-up post detailing the response and featuring additional campaigns and initiatives that we hope readers will check out. Toward that end, please use the comments field to give us ideas. With your help, we can make real change.

President Obama: Halt the Deportation of Parents

Addressing the plight of some 11 million undocumented people currently living in the United States, President Obama’s State of the Union trumpeted comprehensive immigration reform. But what immigrant rights activists really wanted to hear was a promise to halt further deportations. Many of these deportations effectively separate families through a jumbled collection of rules, directives and legislation that tear many of them apart and have left thousands of children in foster care after their parents were deported.

 TO DO

Join The Nation in calling on President Obama to immediately halt the deportation of parents.

 TO READ

This report by Colorlines details the more than 200,000 deportations of parents of US citizens in just more than two years,

 TO WATCH

In this video report, ABC’s Nightline made clear the heartbreaking stories being created by the federal government’s insistence on deporting the parents of US citizens.

video platformvideo managementvideo solutionsvideo player

Save the USPS

On February 6, the Postal Service announced that Saturday first-class mail delivery is scheduled for elimination at the beginning of August—the latest and deepest in a series of cuts that threaten to so undermine the service that it will be ripe for bartering off to the private delivery corporations that have long coveted its routes. As John Nichols has written, this matters because the USPS continues to provide a vital public service with many post offices serving as de facto community centers and with the mail becoming a critical prescription drug delivery system.

 TO DO

Implore your elected reps to block the USPS from cutting Saturday service and to allow it to compete by providing bridge funding for the service and by developing a plan that allows the Postal Service to compete in the digital era.

 TO READ

Nichols foresaw the manufactured crisis of the USPS back in August and made clear that the issue was never one of declining mail volume or bureaucratic inefficiency.

 TO WATCH

This recent episode of Democracy Now! explained why the USPS's financial “crisis” has been entirely manufactured by critics cynically hoping to privatize the post office.

Open Letter on Academic Freedom From 'The Nation' to New York Elected Officials

We note that on February 6, seventeen of the nineteen signatories to the letter from Representative Jerrold Nadler & Co. released another letter thanking president Gould for her "leadership," affirming the right of the college to hold such panels and standing strongly against official defunding threats (though they did not apologize for misrepresenting the college's co-sponsorship of the panel as official endorsement of its speakers' views, or for their false allegations that the college had excluded alternative views). The two names missing from the follow-up letter? Assemblyman James Brennan and former Comptroller Bill Thompson. Earlier in the day, Mayor Michael Bloomberg issued a far less tepid defense of Brooklyn College, saying, "If you want to go to a university where the government decides what kind of subjects are fit for discussion, I suggest you apply to a school in North Korea." We also note that the far more threatening and vicious letter from Lewis Fidler & Co., which had ten signatories, is still extant, though two of the original signatories, Council Members Letitia James and Stephen Levin, have withdrawn their names from it.

 

The Nation supports the right of Brooklyn College to sponsor a panel discussion with Judith Butler and Omar Barghouti on BDS. We urge Brooklyn College President Karen Gould to resist attempts by those who have attempted to intimidate CUNY into canceling, changing, or withdrawing its sponsorship for the panel. We are especially concerned that members of the New York City Council have threatened to withhold further money for CUNY if it does not either cancel the event or withdraw its sponsorship. This is a grave threat to academic freedom and sets a terrible precedent.

 TO DO

We urge readers to sign The Nation’s open letter in support of academic freedom at CUNY. After weighing in, share this info with your friends, family and Facebook and Twitter networks.

 TO READ

In this post, Katha Pollitt makes clear that perceived election math rather than stated fears for the lofty mission of Brooklyn College are driving the bipartisan denunciations of the BDS panel.

 TO WATCH

When Alan Dershowitz led the charge against the BDS forum at Brooklyn College, the pile-on from both sides of the political spectrum was quick and utterly disingenuous, as Chris Hayes explained on Up With Chris.

 

Stop the Keystone Pipeline, Once and For All

In the new issue of The Nation, Mark Hertsgaard reports on how the climate movement is trying to appeal to both President Obama’s visionary and pragmatic sides with stopping the Keystone Pipeline being the first order of business.

 TO DO

A good first step to putting the US on the path to addressing the climate crisis is for President Obama to reject the Keystone XL tar sands pipeline, once and for all. On Sunday, February 17, thousands of Americans will head to Washington, DC, for the largest climate rally in history demanding an end to Keystone’s destructive dreams. Join this historic event to make your voice heard and push the president to start his second term with strong climate action.

 TO READ

This fact-sheet on Keystone makes clear that the project will not reduce US dependence on foreign oil, will not decrease gas prices, will not create nearly as many jobs as promised and will introduce grave dangers into our environment.

 TO WATCH

This inspiring ten-minute film captures the grassroots energy and diverse composition of the movement against the Keystone XL, a 1,700-mile pipeline that would transport tar sands oil from Alberta, Canada, across the United States for refinement and export on the Gulf Coast.

A weekly guide to meaningful action, this blog connects readers with resources to channel the outrage so many feel after reading about abuses of power and privilege. Far from a comprehensive digest of all worthy groups working on behalf of the social good, Take Action seeks to shine a bright light on one concrete step that Nation readers can take each week. To broaden the conversation, we’ll publish a weekly follow-up post detailing the response and featuring additional campaigns and initiatives that we hope readers will check out. Toward that end, please use the comments field to give us ideas. With your help, we can make real change.

Syndicate content