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Nation in the News

Nation in the News

TV and radio appearances by Nation writers and editors, big Nation announcements.

Katrina vanden Heuvel: House Republicans Are 'Governing by Sabotage'

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House Republicans have now attempted to repeal the Affordable Care Act forty times, despite the fact that the bill has been signed into law and ruled constitutional by the Supreme Court. This morning, Nation editor Katrina vanden Heuvel spoke on MSNBC’s NOW with Alex Wagner about the Republican Party’s “suicidal course” and argued that the GOP is asking Americans—specifically young ones—to act against their own self-interest by continuing to fight against Obamacare.

—Rebecca Nathanson

Dave Zirin: The Hypocrisy of Major League Baseball

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This week, Major League Baseball suspended Yankess third baseman Alex Rodriguez through the 2014 season for his role in a scandal involving performance-enhancing drugs. Rodriguez is just one of thirteen players who are facing a season-long ban, though he is the only one who is appealing the suspension.

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Major League Baseball—which reaped the financial rewards of the steroids era through feigned naïveté—is now content to scapegoat the players for the current crisis. Nation sports editor Dave Zirin joins MSNBC’s Martin Bashir to condemn the sport’s hypocrisy for failing to crackdown those in the front office who encouraged the proliferation of performance-enhancing drugs.

—Jake Scobey-Thal

Sharif Abdel Kouddous: Egypt's Increasingly Repressive Political Order

Two days after Egyptian police opened fire on a Muslim Brotherhood rally, killing seventy-two protesters, EU envoy Catherine Ashton met deposed president Mohamed Morsi at an undisclosed location. Ashton shuttled between both Muslim Brotherhood and Egyptian military officials in an effort to broker a peaceful political settlement. 

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But according to Nation contributor Sharif Abdel Kouddous, the prospect of continued bloodshed is very real. Kouddous joins Democracy Now! to explain how the security forces are exploiting recent violence to impose an even more repressive political order and what that means for a peaceful political transition. 

—Jake Scobey-Thal

Katrina vanden Heuvel: The Real Scandal in the New York Mayoral Race

 

On Sunday, Anthony Weiner’s campaign manager quit amid new revelations that Weiner continued to engage in sexually explicit online communications after he resigned from Congress. And while Weiner’s imploding candidacy for New York City mayor has made good headlines, the story has been a distraction from the real scandals—increasing inequality, discriminatory policing practices—that must be addressed in this election.

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Nation editor Katrina vanden Heuvel joins a panel on ABC’s This Week to discuss Weiner’s prospects going forward, but also to refocus the debate away from “Carlos Danger” and towards the issues that truly matter to New Yorkers.

—Jake Scobey-Thal

In Defense of Carlos Danger.

Sharif Abdel Kouddous: Egyptians Are Coming to the Streets in a 'Very Tense and Violent Time'

Since he was ousted from office on July 3, Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi has been incommunicado. But this morning, in the first update on Morsi since that day, Egyptian authorities issued an arrest warrant calling for him to be detained for fifteen days. Sharif Abdel Kouddous, speaking from Cairo, joined Amy Goodman on Democracy Now! to analyze the allegations against Morsi, the protests surrounding this news and the response from the Obama administration.

—Rebecca Nathanson

Dave Zirin: The NFL's Worst Idea Ever

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Aaron Hernandez, the star tight end for the New England Patriots, is facing first-degree murder charges in the death of Odin Lloyd. In response to Hernandez’s arrest, the NFL may consider checking its players’ tattoos for signs of gang affiliation.

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Nation contributor Dave Zirin joins MSNBC’s NewsNation to discuss the hypocrisy of the NFL and the discriminatory racial assumptions that buttress this policy.

—Jake Scobey-Thal

More from Dave Zirin on the NFL’s tattoo hysteria.

Jeremy Scahill: Yemeni Journalist Who Exposed US Strikes Released From Prison

After spending three years in jail on terrorism-related charges, prominent Yemeni journalist Abdulelah Haider Shaye has been released. Shaye was the first to expose the US cruise missile attack on the Yemeni village of al-Majalah—the first Obama administration–approved bombing in Yemen. In 2011, then–Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh announced his intention to pardon the journalist, but changed his mind after a phone call with President Obama. While Shaye was accused of having connections to Al Qaeda, his trial was widely criticized by rights groups and the White House has not provided any public evidence to support the charges.

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The Nation’s national security correspondent Jeremy Scahill and Yemeni-American activist Rook Alwazir join Amy Goodman on Democracy Now! to discuss the bombing he exposed and the role of the Obama administration in his ongoing detention.

—Jake Scobey-Thal

Jeremy Scahill takes us inside America’s new covert wars.

John Nichols: Standing Up to 'Stand Your Ground'

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After President Obama called into question the efficacy of Stand Your Ground laws, Senator Ted Cruz responded by saying that the president was showing a “disregard for the Bill of Rights.” Senator Cruz should check his history. Stand Your Ground laws are neither federal, nor particularly old. In 2005, Florida became the first state to enact a Stand Your Ground law—and since then the legislation has spread to thirty-three states, part of an NRA campaign to strengthen gun-use protections in capitols across the country.

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The Nation’s Washington correspondent John Nichols and democratic strategist Julian Epstein join MSNBC’s Karen Finney to discuss the role of the NRA in advocating for Stand Your Ground legislation and what activists across the US are doing to challenges these broken laws.

—Jake Scobey-Thal

How the NRA became an organization for aspiring vigilantes.

Patricia Williams: How Did Trayvon Martin Become the Defendant in the Zimmerman Case?

In the wake of the news that George Zimmerman was found innocent, many have reassessed the effectiveness of the law and wondered how a trial about the murder of a 17-year-old became more about judging the victim than the defendent. The Nation’s Patricia Williams spoke with Brian Lehrer on WNYC this morning to offer her take on these issues, arguing that this case was handled poorly from the second the police arrived at the scene of the murder. Click here to listen to the full interview.

—Rebecca Nathanson

Mychal Denzel Smith: Why George Zimmerman's Acquittal Has Everything to Do With Race

On Saturday, George Zimmerman was acquitted of all charges in the death of Trayvon Martin. The verdict has elicited a strong response, with protesters taking to the streets in cities across the United States to demand justice for the killing of an unarmed 17-year-old boy. 

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Nation contributor Mychal Denzel Smith joins MSNBC’s Steve Kornacki, along with Maya Wiley, civil rights attorney; Joy Reid, managing editor of The Grio; and Seema Iyer, former prosecutor and defense attorney, to mourn the crises in our system of justice that led to this outcome and to call out the defense team, not only for their tactics in the trial but also their tone in its aftermath.

—Jake Scobey-Thal

White supremacy acquits George Zimmerman.

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