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Nation in the News

Nation in the News

TV and radio appearances by Nation writers and editors, big Nation announcements.

The New Cold War Is Obama’s Rendezvous With Destiny

Obama

President Barack Obama delivers a speech at Palais des Beaux-Arts in Brussels, Belgium. (Reuters/Kevin Lamarque)

In his interview with Ian Masters, Nation contributing editor Stephen Cohen discusses the dangerous tensions between Washington and Moscow. Unlike other regional conflicts, Cohen states that the violence in Ukraine “is global…and the destiny of our children and grandchildren is playing out.” Cohen also critiques the Obama administrations lack of statesmanship and diplomacy: “This is [Obama’s] defining moment. This is what Roosevelt called his rendezvous with destiny and [Obama] seems to flee [his] destiny.” As the Washington hawks continue to take incremental action, Cohen asserts that we’re in the “worst American-Russian crisis since the Cuban missile confrontation.”
Crystal Kayiza

The Civil War Rages on in Eastern Ukraine

Katrina vanden Heuvel on Democracy Now!

The recent downing of flight MH17 over Ukraine has received a huge amount of attention from the press, but, according to Nation editor and publisher Katrina vanden Heuvel, neither the mainstream media nor our government are adequately acknowledging the already violent atmosphere that surrounded the crash. On Democracy Now! this morning, vanden Heuvel explained that the tragedy should have presented an opportunity to end violence that she says has already escalated into civil war: “There should be a renewed effort, not to trigger more violence, but to trigger cease-fire, to trigger talks that could end the humanitarian catastrophe in the southeast of Ukraine.”
—Hannah Harris Green

Stephen Cohen: Is a Russian-American War on the Horizon?

Pro-Russia protesters

Pro-Russian demonstrators take part in a rally in central Donetsk. (Reuters/Konstantin Chernichkin)

"The shootdown of [Malaysian Airlines MH17] was something we couldn't foresee," Stephen Cohen said Tuesday on the John Batchelor Show. "Historians will look back and say that these nearly 300 souls that died on that plane disaster were the first nonresidential victims of the new cold war." The conflict, Cohen said, has worsened as a result of the Kiev government's bombing and mortaring of two large pro-Russian cities in eastern Ukraine—where scores of civilians, including many women and children, have died. Why is Kiev doing this? And why is the White House going along with it? Cohen provided a plausible (and highly concerning answer): "To bate Russia, Putin, into intervening militarily so that NATO will intervene militarily. And that means, somewhere, someone in a position of influence wants a Russian war with NATO and that means a Russian-American war."
—Alana de Hinojosa

Russian and American News Media Give ‘Mirror Image’ Accounts of MH17 Crash

Flight MH17 Crash Site

A pro-Russia fighter secures the area at the crash site of flight MH17 near the village of Hravbove, Eastern Ukraine. July 18, 2014. (AP Photo/Evgeniy Maloletka) 

Nation contributing editor Stephen Cohen discussed Russian and American media reactions to the MH17 crash on the Thom Hartmann Program Friday.  "Alas, the American mainstream press is saying, essentially…the shoot-down of that commerical aircraft is the fault of Russian President Vladimir Putin," says Cohen, contending that the American press does not adequately address the complex series of events that led to the crash, or its own government's involvement in the catastrophe. In a "mirror image" of the American account, Russian media speculate that the United States is at fault because it empowered Kiev to wage a heavy artillery plane assault on Eastern cities in Ukraine, which in turn allowed rebels access to air defense equipment.  According to Cohen, this conflict is part of what he calls the "new Cold War" that has been going on since at least February.
—Hannah Harris Green 

Were Those Aboard Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 the First Victims of ‘the New Cold War’?

Stephen Cohen on Ukraine

There is an ongoing crisis in Ukraine, says Stephen Cohen, and the mainstream media is not doing enough to contextualize the fighting. On Democracy Now!, Cohen explained that when Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 was shot down over eastern Ukraine yesterday, American audiences didn’t have the information at hand to understood what brought us to this horrific crossroads. Cohen says, “The people who died, nearly 300, are the first victims, non-residential victims, of the new cold war.”
—Douglas Grant

Terror Through the Night in Gaza

Sharif Abdel Kouddous on Democracy Now

Palestinian civilians are bearing the brunt of Israel's ongoing military assault on Gaza, says Sharif Abdel Kouddous. “Just a few hours after the ceasefire that Israel had announced,” Kouddous explained on Democracy Now! this morning, “the Israeli military began to pound Gaza from the land, from air, from the sea, with naval guns, with apache helicopters, with F-16 strikes.” With this fresh round of attacks, 56 children have now been killed during the assault on Gaza. A TV production company, a rehabilitation hospital and a hospital that shelters 400 children have also been targeted

Hannah Harris Green 

Katrina vanden Heuvel to Bill Kristol: If You Want War So Badly, Join the Iraqi Army

Katrina vanden Heuvel on Iraq


This Sunday, Katrina vanden Heuvel appeared on ABC’s This Week and challenged Bill Kristol, editor of The Weekly Standard, on Iraq and American foreign policy. Vanden Heuvel called Kristol one of the “architects of catastrophe that have cost this country trillions of dollars, thousands of lives.” She added, “This country should not go back to war. We don’t need armchair warriors, and if you feel so strongly, you should, with all due respect, enlist in the Iraqi Army.”
Victoria Ford

Moral Mondays Has Managed to Go Beyond the Color Line—but Is That So Unprecedented?

Melissa Harris-Perry and Chris Hayes

Yesterday, Melissa Harris-Perry appeared on All In with Chris Hayes to discuss the birth of the interracial Moral Mondays movement. She told Hayes that this initiative goes against many Northern liberals’ perception of the South, which they see as “so utterly backward and so utterly racially divided.” The reality is more complicated, she explains: “There is a level of intimacy, interracially in the US South that hasn’t always led to equality but has meant that there have been moments when interracial political movements could emerge.” This history of fusion movments since the aboliton of slavery should keep us from seeing Moral Mondays as game-changing, says Harris-Perry,”there are strategic partnerships, but we probably should not expect enduring, long-term coalitional change.”
Hannah Harris Green

Stephen Cohen: On Violence in Ukraine

Protest in Ukraine

About a hundred Ukrainian protesters hurled eggs and paint at the Russian Embassy in Kiev on June 14. (AP Photo/Sergei Chuzavkov)

On The John Batchelor Show, Russian historian and Nation contributing editor Stephen Cohen discussed two recent and unsettling events in Ukraine: a spontaneous gas pipeline explosion in central Ukraine and a Ukrainian-led civilian assault on the Russian embassy. Because the explosion, argues Cohen, would benefit neither the Russian government nor the Kiev government, Cohen predicted that “extreme ultranationalists” are responsible. “Assuming it wasn’t an accident,” Cohen says, “I would have to say it was one of these groups.” Later in the show, Cohen critiqued the mob attack on the Russian embassy, where cars where overturned, windows smashed and the Russian flag torn in two. Asserting that all embassies are entitled to full safety and sanctuary, Cohen voiced extreme disappointment that neither the Kiev government nor any other Western states had issued a strong disapproval of this attack.
Alana de Hinojosa

FIFA Ignores Brazil’s Economic Woes, Provoking Resistance

Dave Zirin appeared on MSNBC last night to comment on yet another round of protests and tear-gassing in Brazil. Yesterday in Porto Alegre, Brazilians marched against FIFA’s draining of public coffers, arguing that the $11 billion World Cup budget should go towards alleviating poverty. When the government agreed to host the games, Brazil was experiencing an economic boom, but now a recession has hit the country. FIFA was indifferent to the economic change: “They say, you made your commitment, and we want to see your skin in the game regardless of how your economy is doing. And that’s what I think fueled a lot of the anger Brazilians feel,” Zirin explained to MSNBC’s Ari Melber.
Hannah Harris Green

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