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Nation in the News

Nation in the News

TV and radio appearances by Nation writers and editors, big Nation announcements.

Stephen Cohen: Eastern Ukraine Is in an All-Out War

2014 protest in Kiev

A scene after a 2014 protest in Kiev. (Reuters/Baz Ratner)

During a broadcast of The John Batchelor Show on Tuesday, Stephen Cohen, contributing editor at The Nation, expressed his grim concern about the ongoing Ukrainian-Russian conflict.

“John, I don't know if I've ever said this to you before, but every time you say, by way of greeting, ‘A very good evening to you,’ I keep hoping one day there will be a very good evening in this Ukrainian crisis because, this evening, the news is all terrible,” Cohen said as he began his remarks. Cohen expressed concern about the ongoing conflict and recent attacks in Mariupol, a city in southeast Ukraine. He said the tension might lead the United States and NATO to enter war with Russia.

“Now, I think it’s fair to say that all-out war has broken out in eastern Ukraine between the rebel armies, backed by Russia, and the Kiev armies, backed by the United States,” he said. “That’s what’s going on, into a certain extent of Europe. So, the question politically becomes who started the new fighting.”

Hilary Weaver

 

Read Next: Stephen Cohen on the continued divide in Europe

‘The Nation’ Magazine Names Kai Wright as Features Editor

Kai Wright

(Jedd Flanscha)

Contact: Caitlin Graf, The Nation, press [at] thenation.com, 212-209-5400

New York, NY —January 28, 2015—The Nation, America’s oldest weekly magazine of politics and culture, today announced the appointment of Kai Wright as features editor. In his new role, Wright will edit a wide range of features, investigative reports and editorials, help cultivate new talent and develop new digital ventures. His career has focused on issues of race and racial justice, inequality, labor, health and sexuality, and the magazine looks forward to ramping up its coverage in those areas and more. Wright begins March 2, 2015.

“Kai is an extraordinary writer and editor whose work is dedicated to exposing injustice, as well as to exploring the human capacity for resilience, hope and joy,” says Nation editor and publisher Katrina vanden Heuvel. “I can’t wait to read the pieces he will commission, and those he’ll write himself.”

“For the past 150 years, The Nation has stood for a basic value: our country must make real the promise of its founding documents. The magazine’s editors and writers have born witness to great crimes, hosted dialogues about radical solutions, and spoken truth to power,” adds Wright. “I owe the rights and liberties I have today to many of the people who contributed to that essential conversation, and I’m humbled by the chance to help guide the next 150 years of this work.”

A distinguished journalist and editor, Wright joins The Nation from Colorlines, which he led as its editorial director and editor-at-large, transforming the publication from a bimonthly print journal to a daily digital destination reaching 1 million readers a month. Most recently, he completed a special multimedia series there, examining inequality in the lives of black men, a subject he has also written perceptively about in our own pages. Indeed, Kai’s ties to The Nation run deep, having first written for the magazine in 2006. He is also a reporting fellow at the Investigative Fund at the Nation Institute.

Prior to Colorlines, Kai was senior writer at The Root, senior editor at City Limits, a copy editor at the New York Daily News, and a news reporter at The Washington Blade. He is the author of two books, the award-winning Drifting Toward Love: Black, Brown, Gay and Coming of Age on the Streets of New York and Soldiers of Freedom: An Illustrated History of African Americans in the Armed Forces. He is also the editor of The African American Experience: Black History and Culture Through Speeches, Letters, Editorials, Poems, Songs, and Stories.

Wright is a frequent commentator on the politics of race and inequality on National Public Radio, MSNBC and other national broadcast outlets; most recently, he reported a series on healthcare reform for WNYC News, NPR’s New York City affiliate.

Wright lives in Brooklyn, New York, and can be found on Twitter @kai_wright and on Instagram.

For booking requests or further information, please see contact information above.

About the magazine

Founded in 1865, The Nation is America’s oldest weekly magazine, serving as a critical, independent voice in American journalism and a platform for investigative reporting and spirited debate on issues of import to the progressive community. Through changing times and fashions, The Nation and TheNation.com offer consistently informed and inspired reporting and analysis of breaking news, politics, social issues and the arts—never faltering in our editorial commitment to what Nation Publisher Emeritus Victor Navasky has called “a dissenting, independent, trouble-making, idea-launching journal of critical opinion.”

Stephen Cohen: The European Union Remains Divided

Stephen Cohen on The Thom Hartmann Program

In a Skype chat during The Thom Hartmann Program on Monday, Stephen Cohen, a contributing editor at The Nation, spoke with Hartmann about the division in Europe and media’s role within this division, following the Greek elections and the ongoing Ukrainian-Russian conflict.

“It’s a kind of abyss in American-Russian relations at the moment,” Cohen said. “The European Union is deeply divided politically about what to do about the Ukrainian crisis.”

Cohen said the January 25 election results in Greece will further increase political tension in Europe.

“The austerity program, which is now under attack as a result of the Greek elections, is bringing pressure on Germany, which is now the political leader in Europe…. But the worse the crisis, or political challenge to the austerity program in Europe, which comes from Germany, the more Europe divides, and the more Europe divides, the more it divides in what to do about Russia because that too is an economic burden.”

Hilary Weaver

Stephen Cohen: Ukraine Is in a Fog of War

Ukrainian refugee camp

Ukrainian refugees in tents along the Russian-Ukrainian border. (Reuters/Eduard Korniyenko)

During a visit to The John Batchelor Show on Tuesday, Stephen Cohen, a contributing editor at The Nation, discussed the serious impact of the recent fighting in Ukraine.

“We’re in a fog of war—an expression coming from, I think, World War I, when news reports had become innacurate news reports—misinformation, disinformation from all sides,” Cohen said. “It fueled the war by fueling unwise political decisions. What we do know, though, is your listeners can pull out their calendars and mark down the fighting that began this weekend and continues today…as another fateful lost opportunity in this Ukranian Crisis.”

—Hilary Weaver

Stephen Cohen: It’s 1983 All Over Again in Ukraine

Shelling in Donetsk

An armed pro-Russian separatist stands in front of a building damaged by shelling in Donetsk, August 2014. (Reuters/Sergei Karpukhin)

 

 

On Tuesday, The Nation’s Stephen Cohen joined The John Batchelor Show to discuss the latest violence in Ukraine, and how it might affect the diplomacy process. One of the major issues, Cohen said, was the continued violation of the so-called Minsk accords, signed during diplomacy talks in September 2014. “What we’ve seen…is an extraordinary rapid re-militarization,” Cohen said. “A lot has changed, and for the worse.… it’s hard to find a lot of hope.”

—Naomi Gordon-Loebl

Read Next: Stephen Cohen on how The New York Times got Ukraine wrong

Katrina vanden Heuvel: We’re Already Losing the Lessons of the Paris Unity March

Katrina vanden Heuvel on The Ed Show

On Monday, Katrina vanden Heuvel joined Ed Schultz and Atlantic editor-at-large Steven Clemons to discuss the state of cybersecurity in the event of the terrorist attacks in Paris last week. Vanden Heuvel began by saying that despite the “unity in the streets of Paris” on Sunday’s protests, these lessons are “being lost on people like Lindsey Graham, a foolish man who speaks untruths and fear mongers.” She also pointed to the push of invasion and occupation that followed the 9/11 attacks as the influence of less security in the face of terrorist attacks.

“There should be unity to find a different way to combat terrorism,” she said. “But we are not going to get wisdom from people like Lindsey Graham or John McCain, or I fear, some of the Democrats who have bought into a war against terrorism, which is making the US less secure, not more secure.”

—Hilary Weaver

 

Read Next: Katrina vanden Heuvel on lessons from 'Selma'

‘The Nation’ Magazine Names David Hajdu as Music Critic

CONTACT: Caitlin Graf, The Nation, press [at] thenation.com, 212-209-5400

New York, NY January 12, 2015 The Nation, America’s oldest weekly magazine of politics and culture, today announced the appointment of David Hajdu as music critic. In his new role, Hajdu will write features for the print edition of the magazine and blog regularly at TheNation.com: His first post will be coming soon.

“Whether writing about jazz or classical music, comics or cool, David Hajdu is a writer—and listener—of great range, sensitivity, and depth, and we are delighted that he is joining The Nation as our music critic. I can think of no better critic to pick up the baton once carried in our pages by Nat Hentoff and Edward Said,” says Nation editor and publisher Katrina vanden Heuvel.

“I’ve admired The Nation from a short distance for years, and I know how lucky I am to have a publishing home where intellectual rigor and seriousness of purpose are the mandate. I hope I do okay,” adds Hajdu.

Formerly the longtime music critic for The New Republic, Hajdu is a professor at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism and has written on the arts for numerous publications, including The New York Times Magazine, The Atlantic Monthly, The New Yorker, The New York Review of Books, Rolling Stone and Vanity Fair. As an editor and magazine writer, Hajdu has been a finalist for the National Magazine Award several times, and his articles and essays have been selected for a number of anthologies, including Best Music Writing, Best American Magazine Writing, The New York Times Arts & Culture Reader, and Best American Comics Writing.

Hajdu is the award-winning author of four books—Lush Life: A Biography of Billy Strayhorn; Positively 4th Street: The Lives and Times of Joan Baez, Bob Dylan, Mimi Baez Fariña and Richard Fariña; The Ten-Cent Plague: The Great Comic Book Scare and How It Changed America; and Heroes and Villains: Essays on Music, Movies, Comics, and Culture. He is a three-time finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award and two-time winner of the ASCAP Deems-Taylor Award. Hajdu is presently at work on a history of popular music, to be published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

In recent years, Hajdu has also been increasingly active as a songwriter and librettist for concert music.

He lives in Manhattan with his wife, singer and actor Karen Oberlin, and their family.

For booking requests or further information, please see contact information above.

About the magazine:

Founded in 1865, The Nation is America’s oldest weekly magazine, serving as a critical, independent voice in American journalism and a platform for investigative reporting and spirited debate on issues of import to the progressive community. Through changing times and fashions, The Nation and TheNation.com offer consistently informed and inspired reporting and analysis of breaking news, politics, social issues and the arts—never faltering in our editorial commitment to what Nation Publisher Emeritus Victor Navasky has called “a dissenting, independent, trouble-making, idea-launching journal of critical opinion.”

‘The Nation’ Turns 150

CONTACT: Caitlin Graf, The Nation, press [at] thenation.com, 212-209-5400

New York, NY January 12, 2015 Nation editor and publisher Katrina vanden Heuvel announces the magazine’s extensive and exciting plans to commemorate its 150th anniversary in 2015, marking its tenure as America’s oldest weekly magazine.

Celebrating American and world history, and highlighting the role of The Nation in illuminating that history, the magazine will commemorate its sesquicentennial with a blockbuster special issue, numerous new digital products, a dedicated book on the magazine’s illustrious history, and a feature-length documentary. We will also host a series of nationwide celebrations fostering dialogue, debate, reflection, and action among progressives and free-thinkers—politicians, musicians, writers, activists, poets, and our esteemed readers.

Below, please find vanden Heuvel’s announcement in full. For booking requests or further information, please see contact information above.

 

The Nation Turns 150

For 150 years, The Nation has kept readers informed about what we called in our very first issue “the conflict of ages, the great strife between the few and the many, between privilege and equality, between law and power, between opinion and the sword.” Founded by abolitionists just months after the end of the Civil War, The Nation has never shied from taking sides in that conflict, and it has instigated a great deal of progress along the way.

But while we are excited to revisit the matchless history of The Nation—closely tied, as it is, to the history of the nation—the most gratifying part of our 150th anniversary will be the opportunity to share the important work The Nation is doing today.

Throughout the year, The Nation will mark its 150th anniversary with a variety of innovative print and digital products, a nationwide series of live events and a documentary film by award-winning filmmaker, Barbara Kopple.

At TheNation.com, we launched a new feature on January 1 called The Almanac. Highlighting historic events from each day in history, these daily posts offer an alternative view of world history as seen through the eyes of Nation writers and editors and offer indispensable context to today’s events.

Additionally, every month or two during the anniversary year, TheNation.com will highlight one Nation Ideal on which the magazine has been instigating progress since 1865: racial justice, gender equality, environmental sustainability and civil liberties, to name a few. TheNation.com will feature relevant articles from our archives with commentary by some of the most prominent Nation writers today. For each Ideal there will be a Journey Through History—an interactive multimedia feature that will make learning about the broad sweep of history of each Ideal, both inside and outside the pages of The Nation, visually appealing, accessible and downright fun.

In March, we will publish a paper and e-book history of the magazine written by The Nation’s London bureau chief, D.D. Guttenplan—award-winning biographer of the late Nation great, I.F. Stone—followed in April by a 200-page special anniversary issue featuring essays from the archives by Hannah Arendt, Jonathan Schell, James Baldwin, Martin Luther King Jr. and many others, alongside original contributions by Eric Foner, Noam Chomsky, Toni Morrison, Michael Moore, Naomi Klein, Stephen F. Cohen, Rebecca Solnit and many, many more.

Meanwhile, throughout the year, Nation writers and editors will be touring cities coast to coast hosting panel discussions, variety shows and other audience-inclusive events both to celebrate the magazine’s history and to share visions of radically-different futures. From New York to Tucson to Los Angeles to Madison to Salt Lake City and Seattle to Portland to Washington, DC, and back to New York—and many places in between—these events will put Nation readers, new and old, in conversation with their favorite writers on the issues that matter most: Naomi Klein on the history of environmental activism. Dave Zirin on reporting from the intersection of politics, culture and sports. Kshama Sawant on the promise and peril—and the history—of municipal socialism. Robert Reich on inequality. Ursula LeGuin exposing the power of capitalism, literature and imagination. Patricia Williams and Isabel Wilkerson arguing for a Third Reconstruction. Individually and together, these events will create a special, one-time experience, a gathering-together of The Nation family, which we know will leave an indelible mark on the magazine, and, we hope, on our readers as well.

We hope you will join us for what promises to be an exceptional year, and we hope you’ll invite others to join us as well. At the end of 1865, The Nation declared that it would go down as “one of the most famous years of history.” We are confident that with your help, the 150th anniversary of The Nation will be one, too.

Please watch this space and http://www.thenation.com/150 for regularly updated information.

All best,

Katrina vanden Heuvel

Editor and Publisher, The Nation

 

ABOUT THE NATION

Founded in 1865, The Nation is America’s oldest weekly magazine, serving as a critical, independent voice in American journalism and a platform for investigative reporting and spirited debate on issues of import to the progressive community. Through changing times and fashions, The Nation and TheNation.com offer consistently informed and inspired reporting and analysis of breaking news, politics, social issues and the arts—never faltering in our editorial commitment to what Nation Publisher Emeritus Victor Navasky has called “a dissenting, independent, trouble-making, idea-launching journal of critical opinion.”

Stephen Cohen: How ‘The New York Times’ Got Ukraine Wrong

Anti-government protest in Kiev

Anti-government protesters clash with police in Kiev on February 20, 2014. (AP Photo/Sergei Chuzavkov)

 

 

On Tuesday, The Nation’s Stephen Cohen joined The John Batchelor Show to discuss Western policy towards Ukraine and the media’s latest attempts to cover it. Cohen began by discussing The New York Times’s recent investigation on the ouster of former Ukrainian president Viktor Yanukovych, a piece that he called an “astonishing piece of media malpractice.” In their eagerness to justify US support of the new government, Cohen said, the Times completely missed the story in Ukraine—including the fact that multiple independent investigations by scholars, journalists and witnesses have concluded that the sniper attacks in Kiev in February were part of an “ultra-nationalist” coup. The Times article, Cohen went on to say, is “an attempt to airbrush out of history one of the looming questions of how we got into this new Cold War.”

—Naomi Gordon-Loebl

Read Next: The people’s court of eastern Ukraine

Dave Zirin: Stuart Scott Changed Sports Media and Changed Me

Dave Zirin on The Reid Report

On Sunday morning, legendary ESPN anchor Stuart Scott died at the age of 49. The Nation sports editor Dave Zirin joined Joy Reid on MSNBC’s The Reid Report on Monday to discuss Scott’s legacy. Scott was a “liberator of language,” Zirin said. “He was a…representative of a hip-hop generation and a hip-hop vernacular that a lot of America, and certainly not Bristol, Connecticut, where ESPN is headquartered, wasn’t exposed to before.”

But Scott’s influence wasn’t limited to sports media. Zirin also talked about Scott’s impact on his own experience with cancer. “I [was] in a fog of depression and self-loathing and anger. No one was reaching me,” he told Reid. “And then I watched Stuart Scott’s speech. And I listened, over and over again, to those seven words, where he said, ‘You fight cancer by how you live.’” Scott reframed the traditional cancer narrative, Zirin said—once again, changing the game.

—Naomi Gordon-Loebl

 

Read Next: Dave Zirin on Stuart Scott

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