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One Year Later: Soldier in WikiLeaks Iraq 'Murder' Video Speaks Out in New Film

Today marks the first anniversary of the day we first heard the name Ethan McCord.   Two weeks earlier, WikiLeaks started to become a household name in the U.S.—when Julian Assange released the video he had titled “Collateral Murder.” It showed a 2007 incident in Baghdad when a US Apache copter crew gunned down more than a dozen Iraqis, most likely civilians, on the streets below, including two Reuters staffers.

After a flurry of publicity, the episode soon faded from the media, although three major WikiLeaks releases followed last year, all allegedly coming via Private Bradley Manning, now sitting in near-solitary confinement in the brig at Quantico.

But largely thanks to one soldier who was in the thick of things on that day in 2007, the incident is far from over.

He is Ethan McCord, who spoke out in an interview published by Wired online on APril 20, 2010, after the release of the video to testify that he was on the scene that day and helped rescue two badly injured children (who were riding in a van driven by their father who had tried to helped the wounded only to be killed himself) and carry them to a vehicle that took them to a hospital.  He has since continued to protest what happened that day -- and the war in Iraq.

Now he is featured in a film short that will debut this weekend at the Tribeca Film Festival, with three more screenings to follow.  Here is a link to the film's site which includes background, a trailer and a director's statement in which he reveals he is now working on a feature length film and hopes to talk with the triggerman.

My colleague Kevin Gosztola talked to McCord last month. McCord says that he has turned over all photos from that day and they will air soon. Here is the audio and transcript.

One key quote from McCord: “The video was released on April 5th of 2010. However, the entire incident was written about in a book by David Finkel called The Good Soldiers. So, they’re stating that this was classified, but it was already released back in 2009 through a book so how is it classified if it’s already for released? I mean, word for word this video is described in the book The Good Soldiers so yet we’re going to charge Bradley Manning for releasing classified information. Shouldn’t we also be charging David Finkel for writing this book detailing the entire engagement in his book in 2009?”

Finally, below, here is an excerpt from my The Age of WikiLeaks book—recounting the surprising  interview McCord gave nearly one year ago.

* * *

One of the most remarkable interviews relating to this whole episode came to light on April 20, 2010, when Kim Zetter at Wired revealed that she had located and interviewed one of the soldiers in the video.

He was Ethan McCord, 33, the father of three who had left the Army after seven years and was now living in Kansas. In the video, McCord was seen carrying the 10-year-old boy, Sajad, from the van to seek medical care. He had recently posted a letter online—with fellow soldier Josh Steiber—asking Sajad’s family’s forgiveness and backing the WikiLeaks release of the video.

McCord described his shock at seeing people “destroyed” on the ground and finding the badly injured children in the van, helping a medic take the girl to a nearby building, and then coming back for the boy. After carrying Sajad to a Bradley, “I got yelled at by my platoon leader that I needed to stop trying to save these mf ’n kids and go pull security….

“After the incident, we went back to the FOB [forward operating base] and that’s when I was in my room. I had blood all down the front of me from the children. I was trying to wash it off in my room. I was pretty distraught over the whole situation with the children. So I went to a sergeant and asked to see [the mental health person], because I was having a hard time dealing with it. I was called a pussy and that I needed to suck it up and a lot of other horrible things. I was also told that there would be repercussions if I was to go to mental health.

“I’ve lived with seeing the children that way since the incident happened. I’ve had nightmares. I was diagnosed with chronic, severe PTSD. [But] I was actually starting to get kind of better.… I wasn’t thinking about it as much. [Then I] took my children to school one day and I came home and sat down on the couch and turned on the TV with my coffee, and on the news I’m running across the screen with a child. The flood of emotions came back. I know the scene by heart; it’s burned into my head. I know the van, I know the faces of everybody that was there that day.

“I did see a video on YouTube after the WikiLeaks [video] came out, of the children being interviewed.… When I saw their faces, I was relieved, but I was just heartbroken. I have a huge place in my heart for children, having some of my own. Knowing that I was part of the system that took their father away from them and made them lose their house…it’s heartbreaking. And that in turn is what helped me and Josh write the letter, hoping that it would find its way to them to let them know that we’re sorry. We’re sorry for the system that we were involved in that took their father’s life and injured them. If there’s anything I can to do help, I would be more than happy to.

“Personally, I believe the first attack on the group standing by the wall was appropriate, was warranted by the rules of engagement. They did have weapons there. However, I don’t feel that the attack on the van was necessary…. And where the soldier said [in the video], ‘Well, you shouldn’t take your kids to battle.’ Well, in all actuality, we brought the battle to your kids.

“I think that the bigger picture is what are we doing there? We’ve been there for so long now and it seems like nothing is being accomplished whatsoever, except for we’re making more people hate us.

“I don’t say that Wikileaks did a bad thing, because they didn’t…. I think it is good that they’re putting this stuff out there. I don’t think that people really want to see this, though, because this is war.… It’s very disturbing.”

Greg Mitchell's latest book is Bradley Manning: Truth and Consequences.

The WikiLeaks News & Views Blog for Wednesday, Day 144

As I’ve done for more than four months, I will be updating news and views on all things WikiLeaks all day, with new items added at the top. All times are ET. Contact me at epic1934@aol.com. Read about or order my book The Age of WikiLeaks in print or as an e-book, or brand-new Bradley Manning: Truth and Consequences as e-book here and print here.

UPDATE:  The Thursday edition of this blog.

9:00  My piece on first anniversary of when Ethan McCord -- "hero" soldier in Collateral Murder video -- first spoke out.  Now he's featured in film debuting at Tribeca Film Fest this weekend.

7:35  More intrigue in Israel over new cables in Haaretz.  

5:30  Manning arrives in Kansas -- not in Virginia any more.   Pentagon actually says he will not receive "abusive" treatment.  Well, what else would they say?   But they also say still long time until trial starts or ends.

4:55  Jane Hamsher on MSNBC: Obama Needs to Explain Inconsistent Statements of Manning Treatment 

3:50  Bradley Manning's family  welcomes move to Kansas.  Harder to get to by some, but closer to father.

2:10  Pentagon confirms Manning in the air now, en route to Kansas.

2:00  New low prices for my book The Age of WikiLeaks in print or as an e-book, or brand-new Bradley Manning: Truth and Consequences as e-book here and print here.

1:45  Already a demonstration for Manning set at Fort Leavenworth, for June. 4.   And a supporting Facebook page for Kansas and Missouri folks now up.  (h/t Kevin Gosztola) 

1:25 George Galloway interviews Icelandic MP, former WikiLeaks baccker and member of "Twitter 3," Birgitta Jonsdonttir.

11:35  Glenn Greenwald on "lessons" of Manning's transfer. "But there is one positive aspect of all of this worth highlighting: namely, the mechanisms used to catapult this story into such prominence. Had this been 10 or even 5 years ago, I'm convinced that Bradley Manning's oppressive detention conditions would never have received any substantial attention and he'd wither away indefinitely in Quantico."

10:05  PJ Crowley tweets:  "#Manning's lawyer has raised serious questions about treatment decisions made at #Quantico without foundation. This should be investigated."   See item a bit below for the lawyer link.  See my Manning book for full background.

9:40  My colleague Kevin Gosztola:  Will transfer of Manning to Kansas cause even more isolation?   Quantico was very near D.C., for vistitors and demos. Jeff Paterson of Courage to Resist and the Support Network says, “It wasn’t a secret that we were preparing to rally one to two thousand for an upcoming DC-area pre-trial hearing.”

8:40 Editor of New Statesman (who recently ran article by the WikiLeaks leader)  on meeting Assange:   Christopher Walken meets a young, spectral David Bowie? 

8:35  Transcript of military briefing on moving Manning.

8:30  Al Jazeera: cables show U.S. has "Machiavellian" approach to South America.

8:25  Greenpeace with it's own WikiLeaks style massive document leak -- about company most associated with leaks, BP.

12:10  Wash Post on Manning's transfer, includes news that trial would be held in Washington.

12:05  @WLLegal tweets:   " Fox News spin on Bradley Manning: Gets "prison upgrade" http://fxn.ws/dMkeZ4."
 @Asher_Wolf tweets:  "Manning being moved to Fort Leavenworth prison; WikiLeaks published this prison's operating procedures manual (orig released in 2008!)." 

From late Tuesday

Bradley Manning's attorney David Coombs just out with blog post on what he calls real reason his client being moved to Leavenworth.  It seems the defense was in process of filing write of habeas corpus and decision to move Manning came so quickly Coombs only learned about it via the AP dispatch this afternoon.  He closes, "While the defense hopes that the move to Fort Leavenworth will result in the improvement of PFC Manning’s conditions of confinement, it nonetheless intends to pursue redress at the appropriate time for the flagrant violations of his constitutional rights by the Quantico confinement facility."  

Just back from doing Cenk's show on MSNBC re: Manning.  While I was gone, Pentagon briefing explained that he was moved to bigger quarters (although had plenty of that at Quantico), visits will still be monitored at all times, he will get to interact with other prisoners more, they admit that attention on conditions led to move, and more.   Here's AP update on military's statement including amazing claim the move is so Manning (who had been in near-solitary for 9 months) can get better mental and "emotional" care.  

As noted below, Bradley Manning is being moved from Quantico, Va., brig to Fort Leavenworth in Kansas after worldwide protests. A few facts about Leavenworth: The complex, formally known as the Disciplinary Barracsk, houses the only maximum security military prison. Also, the only death row for military prisoners.  But a medium security unit as well.   The old “castle” (remember the Redford/Gandolfini flick?) was replaced by newer facility in 2002—so there’s that. Hasan Akbar is on death row there. Lt. William Calley was there at one point.

AP has scoop: “U.S. officials say the Army private suspected of giving classified data to WikiLeaks is being moved to Fort Leavenworth in Kansas in the wake of international criticism about his treatment during his detention at the Marine Corps base at Quantico, Va. The officials say an announcement that Army Pfc. Bradley Manning will be moved is expected Wednesday at the Pentagon. The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because the move has not yet been made public.

“Amnesty International has said Manning’s treatment may violate his human rights. A committee of Germany’s parliament has also protested about his treatment to the White House. Manning is being held in maximum security in a single-occupancy cell at Quantico, and he is allowed to wear only a suicide-proof smock to bed each night.”

Alan Dershowitz, as usual, strongly backs Israel but in doing so asks why no war crimes tribunals or major probes of civilian casualties in Iraq and Afghanistan caused by US and Brits have ever been carried out, especially in light of WikiLeaks revelations.

Andy Greenberg at Forbes reveals one reason the NYT didn’t get any traction for its WikiLeaks coverage with the Pulitzer board for a prize: It didn’t even submit any of it. “It’s not clear just why the Times decided not to seek a Pulitzer for its groundbreaking WikiLeaks coverage. When I asked executive editor Bill Keller about the decision by email, he responded that ‘We don’t talk generally talk about what we enter or don’t enter, or why.’ ” Greenberg speculates that Keller may not have wanted to give any boost to Assange.

The Wikileaks News & Views Blog, for Tuesday, Day 143, with Update on Manning's Move to Kansas

As I’ve done for more than four months, I will be updating news and views on all things WikiLeaks all day, with new items added at the top. All times are ET. Contact me at epic1934@aol.com. Read about or order my book The Age of WikiLeaks in print or as an e-book, or brand-new Bradley Manning: Truth and Consequences as e-book here and print here.

UPDATED:  For the Wednesday blog, go here.

9:45  Bradley Manning's attorney David Coombs just out with blog post on what he calls real reason his client being moved to Leavenworth.  It seems the defense was in process of filing write of habeas corpus and decision to move Manning came so quickly Coombs only learned about it via the AP dispatch this afternoon.  He closes, "While the defense hopes that the move to Fort Leavenworth will result in the improvement of PFC Manning’s conditions of confinement, it nonetheless intends to pursue redress at the appropriate time for the flagrant violations of his constitutional rights by the Quantico confinement facility."  See my Manning book for full background.

7:30  Just back from doing Cenk's show on MSNBC re: Manning.  While I was gone, Pentagon briefing explained that he was moved to bigger quarters (although had plenty of that at Quantico), visits will still be monitored at all times, he will get to interact with other prisoners more, they admit that attention on conditions led to move, and more.   Here's AP update on military's statement including amazing claim the move is so Manning (who had been in near-solitary for 9 months) can get better mental and "emotional" care.  

4:00 As noted below, Bradley Manning is being moved from Quantico, Va., brig to Fort Leavenworth in Kansas after worldwide protests. A few facts about Leavenworth: The complex, formally known as the Disciplinary Barracsk, houses the only maximum security military prison. Also, the only death row for military prisoners.  But a medium security unit as well.   The old “castle” (remember the Redford/Gandolfini flick?) was replaced by newer facility in 2002—so there’s that. Hasan Akbar is on death row there. Lt. William Calley was there at one point.

3:45 AP has scoop: “U.S. officials say the Army private suspected of giving classified data to WikiLeaks is being moved to Fort Leavenworth in Kansas in the wake of international criticism about his treatment during his detention at the Marine Corps base at Quantico, Va. The officials say an announcement that Army Pfc. Bradley Manning will be moved is expected Wednesday at the Pentagon. The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because the move has not yet been made public.

“Amnesty International has said Manning’s treatment may violate his human rights. A committee of Germany’s parliament has also protested about his treatment to the White House. Manning is being held in maximum security in a single-occupancy cell at Quantico, and he is allowed to wear only a suicide-proof smock to bed each night.”

3:25 New low prices for my book The Age of WikiLeaks in print or as an e-book, or brand-new Bradley Manning: Truth and Consequences as e-book here and print here.

3:20 Q&A with new Assange “biographer” Andrew Fowler. “It seems certain that Julian Assange will be extradited to Sweden to face the charges of rape and sexual molestation and that the US will try to extradite him. The treatment of alleged WikiLeaks whistleblower Bradley Manning which is being investigated by the UN suggests the US military has been trying to force a confession out of him which implicates Assange. The fact that this tactic does not appear to have been successful does not mean that the US will not try to find a lesser charge by which Assange can be extradited.”

2:00 Alan Dershowitz, as usual, strongly backs Israel but in doing so asks why no war crimes tribunals or major probes of civilian casualties in Iraq and Afghanistan caused by US and Brits have ever been carried out, especially in light of WikiLeaks revelations.

12:50 Andy Greenberg at Forbes reveals one reason the NYT didn’t get any traction for its WikiLeaks coverage with the Pulitzer board for a prize: It didn’t even submit any of it. “It’s not clear just why the Times decided not to seek a Pulitzer for its groundbreaking WikiLeaks coverage. When I asked executive editor Bill Keller about the decision by email, he responded that ‘We don’t talk generally talk about what we enter or don’t enter, or why.’ ” Greenberg speculates that Keller may not have wanted to give any boost to Assange.

12:00 Slow day here so you might flip to my new piece on Wall Street Journal pundit who won Pulitzer—for his editorial blasting what he repeatedly calls “Obamacare.”

9:30 We noted yesterday that Foreign Policy was being given access to Wikileaks cables by the Wash Post and would be mainly reporting on UN-related matters. Now a big story already: US helped Israel try to “contain” the probe into Israel wrongdoing during its war in Gaza. “In the aftermath of Israel’s 2008-2009 intervention into the Gaza Strip, Susan E. Rice, the US ambassador to the United Nations, led a vigorous campaign to stymie an independent U.N. investigation into possible war crimes, while using the prospect of such a probe as leverage to pressure Israel to participate in a US-backed Middle East peace process, according to previously undisclosed diplomatic cables provided by the anti-secrecy website WikiLeaks.”

8:00 Full coverage by my colleague Kevin Gosztola on State Dept response yesterday to cables showing US helping opposition in Syria, plus video.

12:00 The Wizz Kid: Portrait of Julian Assange leaking—into Uncle Sam’s top hat—wins a top prize. See it here. Xavier Ghazi, 60, said he had first thought of calling his painting Pissing Off the Empire.

From late Monday

Ben Smith in Politico: Why P.J. Crowley “went rogue” at State Dept and lost his job over sticking up for Bradley Manning. ” Crowley—to the occasional dismay of some of his colleagues at State and the White House—had come to view himself as having a special public role. ‘There were times when I thought it was important to push for the United States to take a public stand,’ he said of his time at the podium. ‘I thought it was important to make sure that what we were saying and what we were doing would be consistent with, not only our interest but our values.’ ”

 

Fox News’ Shep Smith: WikiLeaks releases are “the only straight answers we get anymore.” Also: “Wait a minute. You get information that the government’s lying to you again, one more lie from the government! I wish they would publish all of it! Every lie they tell ought to be laid bare!”

Reuters: Those cables re US helping opposition in Syria causing some real issues, so State Dept flack says no big deal, we just support democratic movements everywhere…. This comes after official (unnamed) tells Fox that fears grow that Syria will kill opponents thanks to documents released. Certainly unconfirmed.

We’ve been reporting in past day (see below) on new WikiLeaks “partners” in US—finally, beyond the NYT—McClatchy and the Washington Post. Now one more: the Turtle Bay blog at the Foreign Policy magazine site just announced that it was getting to all the cables (in partnership with the Post) to search for unpublished revelations related to the United Nations. It’s been rare for WikiLeaks to made this available to a blog, but it’s possible that the Post arranged it and then got WikiLeaks approval. Stay tuned.

We’ve noted previously that James C. Goodale, former chief counsel to NYT, has offered some pointed critiques of the paper’s exec ed Bill Keller, and yesterday the Times Magazine published a condensed letter to the editor from him re prosecution of Assange. Now he has posted online fuller historical precedent details and don’t miss it.

It’s great that McClatchy folks in DC now have full WikiLeaks trove of cables, although WL has not publicized. It’s especially good because they have backbone and, I hear, are vowing not to show cables to State Dept. or anyone else for approval—unlike what NYT did (though of course they will redact names and take other prudent editing steps). I have written widely about the McClatchy crew—then known as Knight Ridder—being the rare standouts in coverage of the lies during the runup to the Iraq invasion. Jonathan Landay and Warren Strobel and others still there, though Clark Hoyt and John Walcott have moved on.

 

'WSJ' Pulitzer Winner Simply Blasted 'ObamaCare'

When the Pulitzer Prize winners were announced at 3 pm yesterday, I quickly and dutifully posted the list here at The Nation—unable to shake the habit formed by my many years editing Editor & Publisher when we tried, and usually succeeded at, publishing the winners first online. Among the newly anointed was Joseph Rago, in the editorial writing category. The initial list included nothing beyond the fact that he works for opinion side of the Wall Street Journal, meaning that, whatever he wrote, it almost had to be not merely conservative in outlook but archly so.

Later I found the brief, official explanation from the unnamed judges for his win: “for his well-crafted, against-the-grain editorials challenging the health care reform advocated by President Barack Obama.”

Now, one had to wonder about the “against the grain” aspect—no matter how “well-crafted” the columns might be—since there was so much sniping at the president’s plan from across the political spectrum, and wild-eyed criticism from the right. Perhaps Rago had offered a more nuanced critique than one might expect from the Journal and the right? That would surely be worthy of notice.

Alas, that was not the case. The proud Journal linked to the ten entries it had submitted to the Pulitzer board on Rago’s behalf. For starters, four of them had the derogatory term “ObamaCare” right in the headlines. On closer inspection, all ten of them used it in the body of the pieces. And Rago’s arguments were, in the main, predictable and sometimes fact-challenged. One after another it’s simply Rago Against the Machine.

One of his columns, from this past January 19, not among the entries (it was probably past the deadlline), continued the drumbeat. Its headline: “ObamaCare Howlers.” Six days before that another one: “New Jersey Sits Out ObamaCare Fight. “

But young Rago is an expert on many subjects. Check out his March 21 punditry: “No Nuke Disaster… the catastrophe that wasn’t in Fukushima.”

Just last week he co-authored a review of Obama’s “toxic” budget speech: “Did someone move the 2012 election to June 1? We ask because President Obama’s extraordinary response to Paul Ryan’s budget yesterday—with its blistering partisanship and multiple distortions—was the kind Presidents usually outsource to some junior lieutenant. Mr. Obama’s fundamentally political document would have been unusual even for a Vice President in the fervor of a campaign.” And: “The speech he chose to deliver was dishonest even by modern political standards.”

An amusing note: Among the ten entries was a column blasting PolitiFact for calling the right’s (e.g., Rago and the Journal) successful branding of Obama’s “government takeover of health care” as its “lie of the year.” Nowhere did he mention that PolitiFact recently won a Pulitzer of its own. This didn’t seem to bother the judges, although perhaps they agree: Pulitizers don’t nearly matter as much as people claim.

Rago graduated from Dartmouth in 2005, where he edited the famously right-wing Dartmouth Review. Naturally he was soon hired by the Journal and quickly gained notice by mocking the rise of the blogosphere, earning mockery from bloggers even on the right.

Here are just three wonderful Rago-isms from his winning Pulitzer entries:

March 20, 2010: “With the House’s climactic vote on ObamaCare tomorrow, Democrats are on the cusp of a profound and historic mistake, comparable in our view to the Smoot-Hawley tariff and FDR’s National Industrial Recovery Act. Everyone is preoccupied now with the politics, but ultimately at stake on Sunday is the kind of country America will be. The consequences of this bill will not only be destructive for the health-care system and the country’s fiscal condition, though those will be bad enough. Inextricably bound up in a plan as far-reaching and ambitious as ObamaCare are also larger questions about the role of government, the dynamism of American enterprise and the nature of a free society.”

April 2, 2010: “Democrats may have been able to trample the rules of the Senate to pass their unpopular bill on a narrow partisan vote, but they shouldn’t be able to trample the Constitution as well.”

December 23, 2010: “As long as the press corps is nominating ‘lies of the year,’ ours goes to the formal legislative title of ObamaCare, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. For a bill that in reality will raise health costs and reduce patient choice, the name recalls Mary McCarthy’s famous line about every word being a lie, including ‘the’ and ‘and.’”

Greg Mitchell writes a daily blog for The Nation and is the author of twelve books, the latest The Age of WikiLeaks and Bradley Manning: Truth and Consequences.

Pulitzer Prize Winners Announced -- Here's Full List (Plus Finalists)

Winners of the 2011 Pulitzer Prizes were announced this afternoon at 3 pm at Columbia University.  And below list, see the finalists.  Congrats to Eric Foner on winning history book prize.  Relatively weak year for New York Times and Washington Post.  No WikiLeaks-related winner or finalists.  Some good wins by smaller papers.

2011 Pulitzer Prize Winners

Journalism

PUBLIC SERVICE - Los Angeles Times (city of Bell scandal)

BREAKING NEWS REPORTING - No Award

INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING - Paige St. John of the Sarasota Herald-Tribune

EXPLANATORY REPORTING - Mark Johnson, Kathleen, Gallagher, Gary Porter, Lou Saldivar and Alison Sherwood of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

LOCAL REPORTING - Frank Main, Mark Konkol and John J. Kim of the Chicago Sun-Times

NATIONAL REPORTING - Jesse Eisinger and Jake Bernstein of ProPublica (on Wall Street bankers)

INTERNATIONAL REPORTING - Clifford J. Levy and Ellen Barry of The New York Times

FEATURE WRITING - Amy Ellis Nutt of The Star-Ledger, Newark, N.J.

COMMENTARY - David Leonhardt of The New York Times

CRITICISM - Sebastian Smee of The Boston Globe

EDITORIAL WRITING - Joseph Rago of The Wall Street Journal

EDITORIAL CARTOONING - Mike Keefe of The Denver Post

BREAKING NEWS PHOTOGRAPHY - Carol Guzy, Nikki Kahn and Ricky Carioti of The Washington Post

FEATURE PHOTOGRAPHY - Barbara Davidson of the Los Angeles Times
Letters, Drama and Music

-----

FICTION - "A Visit from the Goon Squad" by Jennifer Egan (Alfred A. Knopf)

DRAMA - "Clybourne Park" by Bruce Norris

HISTORY - "The Fiery Trial: Abraham Lincoln and American Slavery" by Eric Foner (W. W. Norton & Company)

BIOGRAPHY - "Washington: A Life" by Ron Chernow (The Penguin Press)

POETRY - "The Best of It: New and Selected Poems" by Kay Ryan (Grove Press)

GENERAL NONFICTION - "The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer" by Siddhartha Mukherjee (Scribner)

MUSIC - "Madame White Snake’" by Zhou Long, premiered on February 26, 2010 by the Boston Opera at the Cutler Majestic Theatre.
 

FINALISTS

Public Service
Bloomberg News
For the work of Daniel Golden, John Hechinger and John Lauerman that revealed how some for-profit colleges exploit low-income students, leading to a federal crackdown on a multi-billion-dollar industry.
The New York Times
For the work of Alan Schwarz in illuminating the peril of concussions in football and other sports, spurring a national discussion and a re-examination of helmets and of medical and coaching practices.
Breaking News Reporting
Staff of Chicago Tribune
For its coverage of the deaths of two Chicago firefighters who were killed while searching for squatters in an abandoned burning building.
The Miami Herald and El Nuevo Herald, a joint staff entry.
For their coverage of a devastating earthquake in Haiti, often working under extreme conditions.
Staff of The Tennessean, Nashville
For its coverage of the most devastating flood in Middle Tennessee history.
Investigative Reporting
Walt Bogdanich of The New York Times
For his spotlighting of medical radiation errors that injure thousands of Americans, sparking national discussion and remedial steps.
Sam Roe and Jared S. Hopkins of Chicago Tribune
For their investigation, in print and online, of 13 deaths at a home for severely disabled children and young adults, resulting in closure of the facility.
Explanatory Reporting
Staff of The Wall Street Journal
For its penetration of the shadowy world of fraud and abuse in Medicare, probing previously concealed government databases to identify millions of dollars in waste and corrupt practices.
Staff of The Washington Post
For its exploration of how the military is using trauma surgery, brain science and other techniques both old and new to reduce fatalities among the wounded in warfare, telling the story with words, images and other tools.
Local Reporting
Marshall Allen and Alex Richards of Las Vegas Sun
For their compelling reports on patients who suffered preventable injuries and other harm during hospital care, taking advantage of print and digital tools to drive home their findings.
Stanley Nelson of Concordia (La.) Sentinel, a weekly
For his courageous and determined efforts to unravel a long forgotten Ku Klux Klan murder during the Civil Rights era.
National Reporting
David Evans of Bloomberg News
For his revelations of how life insurance companies retained death benefits owed to families of military veterans and other Americans, leading to government investigations and remedial changes.
Staff of The Wall Street Journal
For its examination of the disastrous explosion on the Deepwater Horizon oil rig in the Gulf of Mexico, using detailed reports to hold government and major corporations accountable.
International Reporting
Deborah Sontag of The New York Times
For her coverage of the earthquake in Haiti, steadfastly telling poignant, wide-ranging stories with a lyrical touch and an impressive eye for detail.
Staff of The Wall Street Journal
For its examination of the causes of Europe’s debt crisis, taking readers behind closed doors to meet pivotal characters while illuminating the wider economic, political and social reverberations.
Feature Writing
Tony Bartelme of The Post and Courier, Charleston, SC
For his engaging account of a South Carolina neurosurgeon’s quest to teach brain surgery in Tanzania, possibly providing a new model for health care in developing countries.
Michael M. Phillips of The Wall Street Journal
For his portfolio of deftly written stories that provide war-weary readers with fresh perspective on the conflict in Afghanistan.
Commentary
Phillip Morris of The Plain Dealer, Cleveland, Ohio
For his blend of local storytelling and unpredictable opinions, enlarging the discussion of controversial issues that stir a big city.
Mary Schmich of Chicago Tribune
For her versatile columns exploring life and the concerns of a metropolis with whimsy and poignancy.
Criticism
Jonathan Gold of LA Weekly
For his delightful, authoritative restaurant reviews, escorting readers through a city’s diverse food culture.
Nicolai Ouroussoff of The New York Times
For his well honed architectural criticism, highlighted by ambitious essays on the burst of architectural projects in oil-rich Middle East countries.
Editorial Writing
Jackson Diehl of The Washington Post
For his insightful editorials on foreign affairs, marked by prescient pieces critical of America’s policy toward Egypt well before a revolution erupted there.
John McCormick of Chicago Tribune
For his relentless campaign to reform an unsustainable public pension system that threatens the economic future of Illinois.
Editorial Cartooning
Matt Davies
For cartoons in The Journal News, Westchester County, N.Y., work notably original in concept and execution, offering sharp opinion without shrillness.
Joel Pett of Lexington Herald-Leader
For provocative cartoons that often tackle controversial Kentucky issues, marked by a simple style and a passion for humanity.
Breaking News Photography
Daniel Berehulak and Paula Bronstein of Getty Images
For their compelling portrayal of the human will to survive as historic floods engulfed regions of Pakistan.
Carolyn Cole of Los Angeles Times
For her often haunting images of a massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, capturing the harsh reality of widespread devastation.
Feature Photography
Todd Heisler of The New York Times
For his sensitive portrayal of a large Colombian clan carrying a genetic mutation that causes Alzheimer’s disease in early middle age.
Greg Kahn of The Naples (Fla.) Daily News
For his pictures that show the mixed impact of the recession in Florida – loss of jobs and homes for some but profit for others.

**

Letters, Drama, and Music

Fiction
The Privileges by Jonathan Dee (Random House)
A contemporary, wide ranging tale about an elite Manhattan family, moral bankruptcy and the long reach of wealth.
The Surrendered by Chang-rae Lee (Riverhead Books)
A haunting and often heartbreaking epic whose characters explore the deep reverberations of love, devotion and war.
Drama
A Free Man of Color by John Guare
An audacious play spread across a large historical canvas, dealing with serious subjects while retaining a playful intellectual buoyancy.
Detroit by Lisa D'Amour
A contemporary tragicomic play that depicts a slice of desperate life in a declining inner-ring suburb where hope is in foreclosure.
History
Confederate Reckoning: Power and Politics in the Civil War South by Stephanie McCurry (Harvard University Press)
An insightful work analyzing the experience of disenfranchised white women and black slaves who were left when Confederate soldiers headed for the battlefield.
Eden on the Charles: The Making of Boston by Michael Rawson (Harvard University Press))
An impressive selection of case studies that reveal how Boston helped shape the remarkable growth of American cities in the 19th century.
Biography or Autobiography
The Publisher: Henry Luce and His American Century by Alan Brinkley (Alfred A. Knopf)
A fresh, fair minded assessment of a complicated man who transformed the news business and showed busy Americans new ways to see the world.
Mrs. Adams in Winter: A Journey in the Last Days of Napoleon by Michael O'Brien (Farrar, Straus and Giroux)
A graceful account of a remarkable journey by Louisa Catherine Adams, the wife of a future president, who traveled with a young son across a Europe still reeling from warfare.
Poetry
The Common Man by Maurice Manning (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)
A rich, often poignant collection of poems rooted in a rural Kentucky experiencing change in its culture and landscape.
Break the Glass by Jean Valentine (Copper Canyon Press)
A collection of imaginative poems in which small details can accrue great power and a reader is never sure where any poem might lead.
General Nonfiction
The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brain by Nicholas Carr (W.W. Norton & Company)
A thought provoking exploration of the Internet’s physical and cultural consequences, rendering highly technical material intelligible to the general reader.
Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History by S.C. Gwynne (Scribner)
A memorable examination of the longest and most brutal of all the wars between European settlers and a single Indian tribe.
Music
Arches by Fred Lerdahl
Premiered on November 19, 2010 at Miller Theatre, Columbia University, a consistently original concerto that sustains an extraordinary level of sensuous invention as it evolves from one moment to the next.
Comala by Ricardo Zohn-Muldoon
Recording released in June, 2010 by Bridge Records, an ambitious cantata that translates into music an influential work of Latin American literature, giving voice to two cultures that intersect within the term “America.”

 

 

 

 

 

Happy Tax Day—From The Beatles! Guest Stars: Bush, Obama, Clapton

Surely the greatest song for this time of the year was George Harrison’s “Taxman” for The Beatles, the opening cut on Revolver. Of course, it could become a Republican anthem today. Although the flip side is—look at what the money is used for (wars, waste, corporate payoffs).

But ignore all of that for the moment and just… watch, listen, and enjoy a few special versions.

First, a version starring another George—Bush.

For equal time, Obama sings or raps the song.

Now, a wonderful and wacky Beatles cartoon version from 1967.

And last but not least, George Harrison doing it solo —well, not quite, he’s with Eric Clapton live.

Greg Mitchell’s latest books are The Age of WikiLeaks, in print or as an e-book, and Bradley Manning: Truth and Consequences, as e-book here and print here.

 

The WikiLeaks News & Views Blog for Monday, Day 142

As I’ve done for more than four months, I will be updating news and views on all things WikiLeaks all day, with new items added at the top. All times are ET. Contact me at epic1934@aol.com. Read about or order my book The Age of WikiLeaks in print or as an e-book, or brand-new Bradley Manning: Truth and Consequences as e-book here and print here.

UPDATED: The Tuesday version of this blog here.

8:50  Ben Smith in PoliticoWhy PJ Crowley "went rogue" at State Dept and lost his job over sticking up for Bradley Manning.  " Crowley – to the occasional dismay of some of his colleagues at State and the White House – had come to view himself as having a special public role. 'There were times when I thought it was important to push for the United States to take a public stand,' he said of his time at the podium. 'I thought it was important to make sure that what we were saying and what we were doing would be consistent with, not only our interest but our values.”'

 

7:20  Fox News' Shep  Smith: WikiLeaks releases are "the only straight answers we get anymore."  Also: “Wait a minute. You get information that the government’s lying to you again, one more lie from the government! I wish they would publish all of it! Every lie they tell ought to be laid bare!”

4:25  Reuters:  Those cables re: U.S. helping opposition in Syria causing some real issues, so State Dept flack says no big deal, we just support democratic movements everywhere.... This comes after official (unnamed) tells Fox  that fears grow that Syria will kill opponents thanks to documents released.  Certainly unconfirmed.

3:15  Pulitzer Prizes announced -- no Wikileaks-related winners, or even finalists.

2:30 We’ve been reporting in past day (see below) on new WikiLeaks “partners” in US—finally, beyond the NYT—McClatchy and the Washington Post. Now one more: the Turtle Bay blog at the Foreign Policy magazine site just announced that it was getting to all the cables (in partnership with the Post) to search for unpublished revelations related to the United Nations. It’s been rare for WikiLeaks to made this available to a blog, but it’s possible that the Post arranged it and then got WikiLeaks approval. Stay tuned.

1:15 We’ve noted previously that James C. Goodale, former chief counsel to NYT, has offered some pointed critiques of the paper’s exec ed Bill Keller, and yesterday the Times Magazine published a condensed letter to the editor from him re prosecution of Assange. Now he has posted online fuller historical precedent details and don’t miss it.

12:55 It’s great that McClatchy folks in DC now have full WikiLeaks trove of cables, although WL has not publicized. It’s especially good becauset they have backbone and, I hear, vare owing not to show cables to State Dept. or anyone else for approval—unlike what NYT did (though of course they will redact names and take other prudent editing steps). I have written widely about the McClatchy crew—then known as Knight Ridder—being the rare standouts in coverage of the lies during the runup to the Iraq invasion. Jonathan Landay and Warren Strobel and others still there, though Clark Hoyt and John Walcott have moved on.

12:40 When I was at Editor & Publisher, we’d have all the Pulitizer finalists days ago, thanks to Joe Strupp, so we’d know who was in the running. Alas, with 3 pm announcement coming today, we are in the dark. But will anyone win for WikiLeaks stuff? If NYT wins for that, will Keller thank “smelly” Assange?

11:35 We’ve mentioned that film short (soon to be full-length, apparently) on Ethan McCord, the soldier in the “Collateral Murder” video who helped two injured children and has spoken out against incident and the war since, would be shown at the Tribeca Film Festival, which opens this week. Now here is its full schedule, as it is being shown five times. It’s twenty-three minutes long for now. Here’s my recent story about McCord.

11:30 Here’s link at National Security Archive on suing the CIA for not releasing the “Official History” of the Bay of Pigs—after half a century. And here’s what my colleague Kevin Gosztola published yesterday to mark the fiftieth anniversary mentions WikiLeaks and Bradley Manning a few times when posing some rhetorical questions.

 

9:20 Reuters with new cables revealing US Nuclear Regulatory Commission acting more as a cheerleader—and salesman—abroad. They “shed light on the way in which U.S. embassies have pulled in the NRC when lobbying for the purchase of equipment made by Westinghouse and other domestic manufacturers. While the use of diplomats to further American commercial interests is nothing new, it is far less common for regulators to be acting in even the appearance of a commercial capacity, raising concerns about a potential conflict of interest.”

7:40 After all the cable revelations, Haaretz editorial: Israeli politicians should think before they speak.

7:00 There was the deadly 2007 incident in Baghdad, the WikiLeaks “Collateral Murder” video, an upcoming documentary on a soldier, Ethan McCord, who helped two injured children that day, and now the song posted to YouTube. It, too, is called “Collateral Murder” and details events on the ground, and McCord’s actions.

12:25 We noted just below that the NYT “monopoly” in the US on access to the WikiLeaks cable trove seems to have been broken in recent days by McClatchy and Wash Post. Just now Wash Post out with big report on cables showing US State Dept. funding Syrian “political opposition groups and related projects, including a satellite TV channel that beams anti-government programming into the country.… The U.S. money for Syrian opposition figures began flowing under President George W. Bush after he effectively froze political ties with Damascus in 2005. The financial backing has continued under President Obama, even as his administration sought to rebuild relations with Assad.”

12:20 New low prices for my book The Age of WikiLeaks in print or as an e-book, or brand-new Bradley Manning: Truth and Consequences as e-book here and print here.

12:10 Bradley Manning: Whistleblower—or scapegoat?

Some praise the likes of Manning and Julian Assange for their courage, while others hate and fear them. Both reactions are understandable. But if, as a society, we scapegoat them, we are only trying to shift our own burden of guilt onto their shoulders, and to think we can get away with that for very long is a dangerous delusion.
Some praise the likes of Manning and Julian Assange for their courage, while others hate and fear them. Both reactions are understandable. But if, as a society, we scapegoat them, we are only trying to shift our own burden of guilt onto their shoulders, and to think we can get away with that for very long is a dangerous delusion.
Some praise the likes of Manning and Julian Assange for their courage, while others hate and fear them. Both reactions are understandable. But if, as a society, we scapegoat them, we are only trying to shift our own burden of guilt onto their shoulders, and to think we can get away with that for very long is a dangerous delusion.

From late Sunday

We’ve long lamented the seeming NYT “monopoly” in the US on the full trove of WikiLeaks cables—considering that the paper quit reporting on them (and showed many of the key ones to US officials before using). Now it seems McClatchy (and the Wash Post, too) is getting them on a regular basis and reporting on them. Latest comes from ace reporter Warren Strobel (one of the the McClatchy, then Knight Ridder team that got the runup to the Iraq war right) on cables on Iran and what they show about US thirst for info and more.

Noted: Bradley Manning’s friend David House has tweeted that he has not visited the brig at Quantico since early March and suggests he is being denied entry.

Lebanon president questions Wikileaks’ cables “credibility.”

More from Haaretz: Herzog also “vilified” Sharon and Peres.

 

The WikiLeaks News & Views Blog—Special Weekend Edition!

As I’ve done for more than nineteen weeks, I will be updating news and views on all things WikiLeaks all day, with new items added at the top. All times are ET. Contact me at epic1934@aol.com. Read about or order my book The Age of WikiLeaks in print or as an e-book, or brand-new Bradley Manning: Truth and Consequences as e-book here and print here.

UPDATE: Here's the Monday edition of this groovy blog.

SUNDAY *

11:15  We noted just below that the NYT "monopoly" in the U.S. on access to the WikiLeaks cable trove seems to have been broken in recent days by McClatchy and Wash Post.  Just now Wash Post out with big report on cables showing U.S. State Dept funding Syrian "political opposition groups and related projects, including a satellite TV channel that beams anti-government programming into the country...The U.S. money for Syrian opposition figures began flowing under President George W. Bush after he effectively froze political ties with Damascus in 2005. The financial backing has continued under President Obama, even as his administration sought to rebuild relations with Assad." 

8:30  We've long lamented the seeming NYT "monopoly" in the U.S. on the full trove of WikiLeaks cables -- considering that the paper quit reporting on them (and showed many of the key ones to U.S. officials before using).   Now it seems McClatchy (and the Wash Post, too) is getting them on a regular basis and reporting on them.  Latest comes from ace reporter Warren Strobel (one of the the McClatchy, then Knight Ridder team that got the runup to the Iraq war right) on cables on Iran and what they show about U.S. thirst for info and more.

11:00 Noted: Bradley Manning's friend David House has tweeted that he has not visited the brig at Quantico since early March and suggests he is being denied entry. 

9:35  Lebanon president questions Wikileaks' cables "credibility." 

9:00  More from Haaretz:   Herzog also "vilified" Sharon and Peres.

8:45 New low prices for my book The Age of WikiLeaks in print or as an e-book, or brand-new Bradley Manning: Truth and Consequences as e-book here and print here.

SATURDAY *

11:00  Haaretz with latest cable from "Israel File," this one revealing bad behavior by Lieberman.

9:50  Cables reveal problems and discord among Chavez opponents in Venezuela.

7:05  At WL Central:  This Week in WikIleaks  Podcast - Edward Fox with ColombiaReports.com on Colombia Cables .

6:00 @WikiLeaks on man exposed by cables:   "Sued for torture: the White House's Egyptian favorite, Omar Suleiman http://abc.net.au/news/stories/2011/04/15/3192845.htm ."

10:00  Getting lot of attention: former Lebanon leader said in cables he wanted new Syria regime.

9:45  I did radio/podcast late last night, here.

From late Friday

Wash Post finally gets around to reviewing Domscheit-Berg book on Assange, and likes it.

@WLLegal: 6th man arrested—a 22-year-old from Cleveland—in Fed’s probe of pro-#WikiLeaks Anonymous DDoS attacks http://bit.ly/gQAiCf .”

State Dept. spokesman (successor to fired P.J. Crowley) grilled about UN rep being denied unmonitored visit with Manning. Passes buck to Pentagon. Video. “We have nothing to hide.” Claims being “forthright,” but reporter grills him heavily. “Only person who was forthright forced to resign.”

Al Jazeera: After Wikileaks revelations, is Nigeria ripe for its own revolution? “Despite attempts by Nigerian leaders and state-run media to discredit WikiLeaks, the cables have been a powerful reminder for residents and the international community on the extent of corruption in the country and how deep its problems go. But as voters head to the polls for presidential and regional elections, how many will be influenced by the material published over the last few months, and could such revelations bring about real change?”

Don’t miss important interview with Evan Knappenberger, a former military intel specialist, who contacted me earlier this week to say he’d been flown to West Coast to be interviewed for Part II of Frontline’s look at his former colleague Bradley Manning. He’s also a member of Iraq Veterans for Peace.

The WikiLeaks News & Views Blog for Friday, Day 139

As I’ve done for more than nineteen weeks, I will be updating news and views on all things WikiLeaks all day, with new items added at the top. All times are ET. Contact me at epic1934@aol.com. Read about or order my book The Age of WikiLeaks in print or as an e-book, or brand-new Bradley Manning: Truth and Consequences as e-book here and print here.

UPDATE Go here for special weekend edition of this blog.

2:45 State Dept. spokesman (successor to fired P.J. Crowley) grilled about UN rep being denied unmonitored visit with Manning. Passes buck to Pentagon. Video. “We have nothing to hide.” Claims being “forthright,” but reporter grills him heavily. “Only person who was forthright forced to resign.”

1:00 Al Jazeera: After Wikileaks revelations, is Nigeria ripe for its own revolution? “Despite attempts by Nigerian leaders and state-run media to discredit WikiLeaks, the cables have been a powerful reminder for residents and the international community on the extent of corruption in the country and how deep its problems go. But as voters head to the polls for presidential and regional elections, how many will be influenced by the material published over the last few months, and could such revelations bring about real change?”

11:50 New low prices for my book The Age of WikiLeaks in print or as an e-book, or brand-new Bradley Manning: Truth and Consequences as e-book here and print here.

9:10 Don’t miss important interview with Evan Knappenberger, a former military intel specialist, who contacted me earlier this week to say he’d been flown to West Coast to be interviewed for Part II of Frontline’s look at his former colleague Bradley Manning. He’s also a member of Iraq Veterans for Peace. Among his comments:

* “I was involved in torture in Iraq. Part of an intel analyst’s job is ‘targeting.’ You take a human being and put him on a piece of paper, distill his life into one piece of paper. You’ve got a grid coordinate of where he lives and a little box that says what to do with him: kill, capture, detain, exploit, source—you know, there’s different things you can do with him. When I worked in targeting, it was having people killed.”

* “Most of the guys I went through intel school with, who went to Iraq with me, are either dead, killed themselves, are in a long-term care institution or completely disabled. I’m actually 50 percent disabled via PTSD (post traumatic stress disorder), mostly because of the stuff that happened.”

* “I could look up FBI files on the SIPRNet. In fact, I was reading Hunter Thompson’s Hell’s Angels book, and I was like ‘this sounds cool,’ and I looked up all the Hell’s Angels. We looked up the JFK assassination, I couldn’t find anything on that. It was kind of a game, but, yeah, that’s the SIPRNet. You’ve got access to every so-called sensitive piece of information.”

8:15 From Haaretz, new wrapup of what cables it’s published in past days have shown about Israeli and foreign leaders.

8:10 Now the Hindu puts up video of its Assange itnerview that it’s had in print all week.

8:00 The Guardian with big scoop off diplomatic cable on BP oil spill—but this time it’s from FOIA “leak,” not WikiLeaks.

12:00 Reuters: “U.S. State Department cables obtained by WikiLeaks has revealed that U.S. investigators fear that China has stolen ‘terabytes’ of sensitive data from the U.S. Government. In a cable obtained by Reuters, U.S. investigators expressed fears about the theft of usernames and passwords for State Department computers to designs for multi-billion dollar weapons systems.

“The cable revealed how the U.S. have traced systems breaches—colorfully code-named “Byzantine Hades” by U.S. investigators—to the Chinese military. An April 2009 cable even pinpoints the attacks to a specific unit of China’s People’s Liberation Army.”

 

From late Thursday

Winning designs for WikiLeaks T-shirts revealed!

Good Wash Post wrap-up today on latest controversy surrounding Manning not allowed unmonitored visit by UN prober.

Wired: The “Twitter 3” hit back at DOJ move. Next court hearing April 22.

It’s official, Assange memoir delayed indefinitely. Was due last week. Publisher says, pub dates change all the time. Still listed as April 7 at Amazon. Assange has had to deal with legal case since signing $1 million deal, plus continuing release of cables.

Round-up on what cables show on Israel and Hamas in Gaza via WLCentral

Lengthy Q&A with Glenn Greenwald coming out of our “standing room only” panel at the big Media Reform conference last weekend. Glenn also talks about “corporate media,” the NYT and torture, and his daily reading habits.

Helena Kennedy in The New Statesman on “conundrum” posed by sex crime case against Assange. Perhaps wrong choice of headline, with reference to “one size fits all.”

 

Rand Appalling: New 'Atlas Shrugged' Movie Booed Off Planet

It takes a lot to get a 0% at the mass market critics’ consensus site Rotten Tomatoes. Pick an awful movie you can think of and it probably managed a 5% or maybe even a 25%. Somehow, Atlas Shrugged, Part I (yes! more to look forward to!), which opens Friday, has at this writing achieved the rare feat.

In other words, not a single critic to date, from major and minor outlet, high or lowest of low of lowbrow, likes it one bit. I like the headline over the Chicago Tribune review: “Taxing Indeed.” Still waiting for “Don’t Go (Galt) There.” Or “Born Under a Bad Ayn.”

Oddly, there’s no New York Times review today. A political statement? Or was the paper barred from the screening room?

Here’s a sampling of commentary:

Carrie Rickey, Philadelphia Inquirer: “Atlas Shrugged. I arched eyebrow, scrunched forehead, yawned.”

Roger Ebert: “The most anticlimactic non-event since Geraldo Rivera broke into Al Capone’s vault. I suspect only someone very familiar with Rand’s 1957 novel could understand the film at all, and I doubt they will be happy with it. For the rest of us, it involves a series of business meetings in luxurious retro leather-and-brass board rooms and offices, and restaurants and bedrooms that look borrowed from a hotel no doubt known as the Robber Baron Arms.”

Joe Morgenstern, Wall Street Journal: “The book was published in 1957, yet the clumsiness of this production makes it seem antediluvian.”

Bill Goodykoontz, Arizona Republic: “It has taken decades to bring Ayn Rand’s “Atlas Shrugged” to the big screen.They should have waited longer.”

Kurt Loder, the former Rolling Stone writer, for the Libertarian site Reason Online: “The new, long-awaited film version of Atlas Shrugged is a mess, full of embalmed talk, enervated performances, impoverished effects, and cinematography that would barely pass muster in a TV show. Sitting through this picture is like watching early rehearsals of a stage play that’s clearly doomed.”

Peter Dubruge, Variety: “Part one of a trilogy that may never see completion, this hasty, low-budget adaptation would have Ayn Rand spinning in her grave.”

Washington Post: “nearly as stilted, didactic and simplistic as Rand’s free-market fable.”

Loren King, Boston Globe: “Even fans of Rand’s 1957 antigovernment manifesto may balk at having to endure dialogue that would be banal on the Lifetime channel, along with wooden performances…”

Greg Mitchell’s two latest books are The Age of WikiLeaks, in print or as an e-book, and Bradley Manning: Truth and Consequences, as e-book here and print here.

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