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Christopher Hayes | The Nation

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Christopher Hayes

Christopher Hayes

Nation editor-at-large and host of MSNBC’s All In with Chris Hayes.

Romney's '47 Percent' Claim Shows Weak Class Analysis

Mitt Romney’s contention that “47 percent” of Americans won’t vote for him not only condemns nearly half the country, but shows alarming political and class naïveté. Contrary to Romney’s “makers and takers” dichotomy, the American electorate votes on more fragmented lines. The Nation’s John Nichols joins Saturday’s panel on Up with Chris Hayes, pointing out that more than 30 percent of poor Americans have voted for Republicans in past elections.

Steven Hsieh

For more on the political fallout from Romney’s “47 percent” video, read Greg Mitchell’s latest poll analysis.

Fighting Poverty Is Part of Education Reform

How interlocked is poverty with the poor state of public education? As the Chicago Teachers Union heads into its second week on strike, guests on Up with Chris Hayes, hosted this weekend by Majority Report’s Sam Seder, talked about the deeply rooted challenges facing America’s crumbling school system. Nation columnist Gary Younge joined this Sunday’s discussion, saying, “There’s a limit to how much education excellence you can get when kids are getting shot and not eating breakfast.”

Steven Hsieh

Parched Corn Fields and the Global Market

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Corn prices have spiked 50 percent over the past two months—the same months that have established this season as our worst period of drought in more than fifty years. Lack of water combined with extreme heat for stretches of 100 or more days is spelling doom for crops like corn and soybeans, and prices are following suit.

On his show Sunday, Chris spoke with an Ohio produce farmer whose fields of failed crops point to a problem that goes far beyond her family’s losses: the reverberations of parched fields in the Midwest may be felt around the world.

—Zoë Schlanger

How Do Attacks on Bain Go Over With Wealthy Democrats?

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With a pitch-perfect emblem of gilded-age greed as his opponent, and private equity in the spotlight, why isn't Obama much farther ahead in the polls? Nation editor Katrina vanden Heuvel went on Chris’s show this weekend for a look at how the Obama campaign’s attack on Romney's Bain Capital record might sit with the Democratic 1 percent, and how the party can address that elephant in the room.

—Zoë Schlanger

What Will It Take for Society to Care About Global Warming?

Despite record-breaking heat and devastating fires, the idea that the earth is warming still illicits as much hostility and doubt as did, well, the idea that cigarettes cause cancer before the death toll overwhelmed the tobacco industry’s PR efforts.

With 27 percent of meteorologists surveyed calling global warming a hoax, what will it take to get people to care about global warming? On his show Sunday, Chris Hayes took a look at life in the disaster era and what options exist to combat climate ignorance.

—Zoë Schlanger

How Will Arizona's Anti-Immigrant Law Be Implemented Now?

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Arizona’s harsh immigration statute, SB 1070, took a judicial beating last month at the hands of the Supreme Court. Of the four provisions reviewed, the Court found three unconstitutional. With several other states considering similar legislation, where does the bill go from here?

On his show Sunday, Chris spoke with the bill’s co-author, Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, who didn’t sound too worried (two of the stricken provisions are “relatively minor,” he said). After the years the Kansas Republican has spent championing the bill, Chris wanted to know, “Why is this the thing that animates you?”

—Zoë Schlanger

The State of the Minimum Wage

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For the first time since the recession, Rhode Island raised its minimum wage, from $7.40 to $7.75. That figure is still shy of neighboring states Massachusetts's ($8.00) and Connecticut's ($8.25) wages, and doesn't change the fact that there is no state where a person can afford a two-bedroom apartment working a forty-hour week on any state's minimum wage.

The federal minimum wage (despite campaign promises) is still $7.25, lower than what a minimum-wage worker made in 1968, adjusted for inflation.

On his show Saturday, Nation Editor-at-Large Chris Hayes put Rhode Island’s news into perspective, along with a host of stories that you should know from last week.

—Zoë Schlanger

What Can We Do About Gentrification?

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With new data out on the fastest-whitening zip codes in America, major US cities—New York and Washington DC, especially—are experiencing cultural and electoral shifts that current policy may not be evolved enough to handle. Are we self-segregating as we get more diverse? What does balanced integration look like? On his show Sunday, Nation editor-at-large Chris Hayes asks what policies the country needs to confront urban gentrification. Columbia University architecture professor Michael Bell and Ta-Nehisi Coates of The Atlantic weigh in.

—Zoë Schlanger

Jeremy Scahill: Obama's Assassination Program

Is the Obama administration using targeted killing to assassinate people who might otherwise have been detained? In this episode of Up w/ Chris Hayes, Jeremy Scahill of The Nation Institute argues that President Obama is “running an assassination program,” and that killing innocents gives people a non-ideological reason to hate this country and to join the ranks of those fighting against it.

Erin Schikowski

Confronting the Civilian-Military Disconnect

On last Sunday’s episode of Up, Chris Hayes engaged in an in-depth conversation about our culture’s use of the word “hero” to describe fallen servicemen and women. His comments set off a round of discussions on the nature of our wars, who’s fighting them and whether a TV pundit should even be empowered to deny or even confer such designations. On today’s show, Hayes confronted the heated debate he set off, saying that the responses he received after the episode illustrate a key point he was attempting to make with his comments: “We have a society that on the one hand has become comfortable with war, and on the other hand wants to distance itself from it as much as possible: to outsource it to contractors, to robots and to the 2.3 million volunteer men and women who have been asked to serve for longer durations than at any time in recent history.” Watch this clip for the full discussion.

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