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Latin America Today | The Nation

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Latin America Today

NYU professor of Latin American history and Nation contributor Greg Grandin is one of four Latin American experts who visited the Charlie Rose Show recently to discuss contemporary Latin America and the future of the region. In this clip Rose asks the panelists, "where is Latin America today?"

Dean of Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs John Coatesworth and Incoming President of the Inter-American Dialogue Michael Shifter describe the current state of Latin America as an "odd point" in its history because although each country is going in a different direction than their neighbors, the one similarity they all have is their willingness or desire to distance themselves politically from the United States. Latin America is "at a point where it's defining its own future...and its relationship with the United States is becoming much more complicated," Coatesworth said.

Grandin agrees with his fellow panelists and points out that it is the center or center-left political coalitions that have emerged within recent years that are spearheading the move away from US policies, in particular militarization and deregulation, which Grandin explains have "derailed" the US.

NYU professor of Latin American history and Nation contributor Greg Grandin is one of four Latin American experts who visited the Charlie Rose Show recently to discuss contemporary Latin America and the future of the region. In this clip Rose asks the panelists, "where is Latin America today?"

Dean of Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs John Coatesworth and Incoming President of the Inter-American Dialogue Michael Shifter describe the current state of Latin America as an "odd point" in its history because although each country is going in a different direction than their neighbors, the one similarity they all have is their willingness or desire to distance themselves politically from the United States. Latin America is "at a point where it's defining its own future...and its relationship with the United States is becoming much more complicated," Coatesworth said.

Grandin agrees with his fellow panelists and points out that it is the center or center-left political coalitions that have emerged within recent years that are spearheading the move away from US policies, in particular militarization and deregulation, which Grandin explains have "derailed" the US.

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