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Eric Alterman | The Nation

Eric Alterman

Author Bios

Eric Alterman

Eric Alterman

Columnist

Eric Alterman is a Distinguished Professor of English, Brooklyn College, City University of New York, and Professor of Journalism at the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism. He is also "The Liberal Media" columnist for The Nation and a fellow of The Nation Institute, a senior fellow at the Center for American Progress in Washington, DC, where he writes and edits the "Think Again" column, a senior fellow (since 1985) at the World Policy Institute. Alterman is also a regular columnist for Moment magazine and a regular contributor to The Daily Beast. He is the author of seven books, including the national bestsellers, What Liberal Media? The Truth About Bias and the News (2003, 2004), and The Book on Bush: How George W. (Mis)leads America (2004). The others include: When Presidents Lie: A History of Official Deception and its Consequences, (2004, 2005); His Sound & Fury: The Making of the Punditocracy (1992, 2000), which won the 1992 George Orwell Award; It Ain't No Sin to be Glad You're Alive: The Promise of Bruce Springsteen (1999, 2001), which won the 1999 Stephen Crane Literary Award and Who Speaks for America? Why Democracy Matters in Foreign Policy, (1998). His most recent book is Why We're Liberals: A Handbook for Restoring America's Most Important Ideals (2008, 2009).

Termed "the most honest and incisive media critic writing today" in the National Catholic Reporter, and author of "the smartest and funniest political journal out there," in the San Francisco Chronicle, Alterman is frequent lecturer and contributor to numerous publications in the US, Europe and Latin America. In recent years, he has also been a columnist for: MSNBC.com, Worth, Rolling StoneMother Jones, and the Sunday Express (London), a history consultant to HBO films and a senior fellow at Media Matters for America. A former Adjunct Professor of Journalism at NYU and Columbia, Alterman received his B.A. in History and Government from Cornell, his M.A. in International Relations from Yale, and his Ph.D. in US History from Stanford. He lives with his family in Manhattan.

Articles

News and Features

As the Bush Administration's incompetence turns Iraq into a terrorist
training camp, Americans should look to FDR, who waged war for
unavoidable threats, not ideology, while still fostering good will
among US allies.

New Orleans was not an unpredictable disaster--it was
a model for the incompetence of the Bush Administration. And when the
next disaster comes, we will all be under water.

The most remarkable aspect of the media's treatment of the hurricane coverage
was the return of the poor, in coverage that was neither condescending nor condemnatory.

Thirty summers ago, Bruce Springsteen's Born to Run exploded the cynicism and complacency of a morally exhausted era and gave a new generation reason to believe in rock and roll.

The so-called liberal New York Times bashed Bill Clinton every chance it got, and whitewashes Ed Meese. Go figure.

Even so-called liberal publications frequently tilt rightward.

The media passed along without prejudice Karl Rove's
deliberate distortions of Richard Durbin's words.

John Harris's history of the Clinton Administration deserves much of the praise it has received, but it ignores the media's anti-Clinton animus.

In its campaign against Newsweek, the Bush Administration seeks to undermine already faltering public confidence.

Why do Americans trust Bush and the Republicans on national security issues?

Blogs

The Larry Sanders Show and the compromised administration of Obama.
The J Street conflict, the life of a career professional military officer and the mail.
Alterman and Reed respond to the critics, music reviews and the mail.
Some more problems with Peretz, NPR's oppressive objectivity and Alter-reviews.
American culture from Saul Bellows to Janeane Garofalo to NPR.
Eric on the continuing debacle at TNR, Reed's opinion on editorial endorsements and the mail.
Poor farmers, stupid Americans and lying politicians.
A tale of two attacked cities, or the differences between New York and Oklahoma City.