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Daniel Singer | The Nation

Daniel Singer

Author Bios

Daniel Singer

Europe Correspondent

Daniel Singer, for many years The Nation's Paris-based Europe correspondent, was born on September 26, 1926, in Warsaw, was educated in France, Switzerland and England and died on December 2, 2000, in Paris.

He was a contributor to The Economist, The New Statesman and the Tribune and appeared as a commentator on NPR, "Monitor Radio" and the BBC, as well as Canadian and Australian broadcasting. (These credits are for his English-language work; he was also fluent in French, Polish, Russian and Italian.)

He was the author of Prelude to Revolution: France in May 1968 (Hill & Wang, 1970), The Road to Gdansk (Monthly Review Press, 1981), Is Socialism Doomed?: The Meaning of Mitterrand (Oxford, 1988) and Whose Millennium? Theirs or Ours? (Monthly Review Press, 1999).

A specialist on the Western European left as well as the former Communist nations, Singer ranged across the Continent in his dispatches to The Nation. Singer sharply critiqued Western-imposed economic "shock therapy" in the former Eastern Bloc and US support for Boris Yeltsin, sounded early warnings about the re-emergence of Fascist politics into the Italian mainstream, and, across the Mediterranean, reported on an Algeria sliding into civil war.

The Daniel Singer Millennium Prize Foundation was founded in 2000 to honor original essays that help further socialist ideas in the tradition of Daniel Singer.

 

Articles

News and Features

François Mitterrand badly wanted to leave a mark, an imprint.

"It's not a revolt, Sire, or a revolution; it's the beginning of the end of the reign of big business, of capital, over the minds of the people," a courtier might have told Jacques Chirac if, lik

For once the news from France's racist front is optimistic. At least the worst will not happen.

Europe, you are rightly told, is swinging to the left. In thirteen of
the fifteen countries making up the European Union, the Social Democrats
are now in office.

Kwasniewski the Red versus Walesa the gravedigger of Communism--the duel for Poland's presidency is being presented as if it were the old drama all over again.

On September 29 French viewers watching the news were offered a bloody Hollywood thriller as an extra. It was the end of a long manhunt.

Orwell had it right. It is not enough to obey Big Brother. You must love him, too.

Early on the morning of June 8, a messenger arrived at an apartment in one of the poshest districts of Paris bearing documents to be signed by a former high-level government official and prominen

"We are all German Jews" chanted 50,000 Frenchmen at the gates of the Bastille in 1968; I was recently reminded of this episode, which has become revolutionary lore, when Holocaust was sho