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Barbara Crossette | The Nation

Barbara Crossette

Author Bios

Barbara Crossette

Barbara Crossette is The Nation's United Nations correspondent. A former foreign correspondent for the New York Times, she is the author of several books on Asia, including So Close to Heaven: The Vanishing Buddhist Kingdoms of the Himalayas, published by Alfred A. Knopf in 1995 and in paperback by Random House/Vintage Destinations in 1996, and a collection of travel essays about colonial resort towns that are still attracting visitors more than a century after their creation, The Great Hill Stations of Asia, published by Westview Press in 1998 and in paperback by Basic Books in 1999. In 2000, she wrote a survey of India and Indian-American relations, India: Old Civilization in a New World, for the Foreign Policy Association in New York. She is also the author of India Facing the 21st Century, published by Indiana University Press in 1993.

Articles

News and Features

Women’s reproductive rights are at risk of being de-emphasized as UN member nations draft the Sustainable Development Goals.

Former top UN diplomat Lakhdar Brahimi lays out how decades of naïveté about Arab societies, poor planning and post-conflict miscalculations have fostered a deep mistrust and lack of confidence in the United States.

Zeid Ra’ad Zeid al-Hussein’s predecessor, Navi Pillay, drew attention to human rights violations across the globe. Will Zeid do the same?

Members of Modi's Bharitaya Janata Party have demonstrated their power to oppresss Muslims, wade into censorship and police the arts.

When Indians go to the polls starting April 7th, the country’s system of democracy will be at risk.

Thanks to the deft negotiations of this veteran UN troubleshooter, tensions have eased in the Geneva peace talks. 

On human rights, nuclear energy, climate change and more, the US and India are set to clash. 

An operation of this scale, in the midst of a civil war with a fragmented armed opposition, has never been attempted before.

In arriving at a unanimous agreement on a resolution to disarm Syria of its chemical weapons, the Security Council has proved that the UN still matters.

The UN must investigate all allegations of who has used chemical weapons.