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Alexander Cockburn | The Nation

Alexander Cockburn

Author Bios

Alexander Cockburn

Columnist

Alexander Cockburn, The Nation's "Beat the Devil" columnist and one of America's best-known radical journalists, was born in Scotland and grew up in Ireland. He graduated from Oxford in 1963 with a degree in English literature and language.

After two years as an editor at the Times Literary Supplement, he worked at the New Left Review and The New Statesman, and co-edited two Penguin volumes, on trade unions and on the student movement.

A permanent resident of the United States since 1973, Cockburn wrote for many years for The Village Voice about the press and politics. Since then he has contributed to many publications including The New York Review of Books, Harper's Magazine, The Atlantic Monthly and the Wall Street Journal (where he had a regular column from 1980 to 1990), as well as alternative publications such as In These Times and the Anderson Valley Advertiser.

He has written "Beat the Devil" since 1984.

He is co-editor, with Jeffrey St Clair, of the newsletter and radical website CounterPunch(http://www.counterpunch.org) which have a substantial world audience. In 1987 he published a best-selling collection of essays, Corruptions of Empire, and two years later co-wrote, with Susanna Hecht, The Fate of the Forest: Developers, Destroyers, and Defenders of the Amazon (both Verso). In 1995 Verso also published his diary of the late 80s, early 90s and the fall of Communism, The Golden Age Is In Us. With Ken Silverstein he wrote Washington Babylon; with Jeffrey St. Clair he has written or coedited several books including: Whiteout, The CIA, Drugs and the Press; The Politics of Anti-Semitism; Imperial Crusades; Al Gore, A User's Manual; Five Days That Shook the World; and A Dime's Worth of Difference, about the two-party system in America.

 

 

Articles

News and Features

It's hard to choose which deserves the coarser jeer: the excited baying
in the press about the nondiscovery of weapons of mass destruction in
Iraq, or the wailing about the 3-to-2 decision of t

Thank God for fakers! Matchless as deflaters of human and institutional
pretension, they furnish us rich measures of malicious glee at the
red-faced victims.

Come June 4, Ed Rosenthal will be back in US District Court in San
Francisco, to hear what sentence Judge Charles Breyer has decided to
impose.

As a million Shiite pilgrims streamed toward Karbala shouting, "No to
America, no to Saddam, no to tyranny, no to Israel!" can't you just
imagine the plash of complacent I Told Him So's from th

The risks of war? There was the risk of being bombed if you had the
misfortune to live in a neighborhood where US targeters thought Saddam
Hussein might be located.

Suddenly the sky is dark with chickens coming home to roost, and bedtime
reading is Thucydides' account of the disastrous Athenian siege of
Syracuse.

At last the leaders of the Democratic Party have moved decisively,
hauling out their ripest comminations and hurling them at--no, not at
George Bush.

Who's the hack? I nominate The New Yorker's Jeffrey Goldberg.
He's the new Remington, though without the artistic talent.

Events do rush by us in a blur, I know, but let's not abandon Secretary
of State Colin Powell's February 5 UN speech to the graveyard of history
without one last backward glance.

The worse the state treats kids, the more the state's prosecutors chase
after inoffensive "perverts" in the private sector who have committed
the so-called crime of getting sexual kicks out of

Blogs

With a new film out about Webb, Kill the Messenger, we look back at Cockburn’s testament to the investigative reporter.