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Alexander Cockburn | The Nation

Alexander Cockburn

Author Bios

Alexander Cockburn

Columnist

Alexander Cockburn, The Nation's "Beat the Devil" columnist and one of America's best-known radical journalists, was born in Scotland and grew up in Ireland. He graduated from Oxford in 1963 with a degree in English literature and language.

After two years as an editor at the Times Literary Supplement, he worked at the New Left Review and The New Statesman, and co-edited two Penguin volumes, on trade unions and on the student movement.

A permanent resident of the United States since 1973, Cockburn wrote for many years for The Village Voice about the press and politics. Since then he has contributed to many publications including The New York Review of Books, Harper's Magazine, The Atlantic Monthly and the Wall Street Journal (where he had a regular column from 1980 to 1990), as well as alternative publications such as In These Times and the Anderson Valley Advertiser.

He has written "Beat the Devil" since 1984.

He is co-editor, with Jeffrey St Clair, of the newsletter and radical website CounterPunch(http://www.counterpunch.org) which have a substantial world audience. In 1987 he published a best-selling collection of essays, Corruptions of Empire, and two years later co-wrote, with Susanna Hecht, The Fate of the Forest: Developers, Destroyers, and Defenders of the Amazon (both Verso). In 1995 Verso also published his diary of the late 80s, early 90s and the fall of Communism, The Golden Age Is In Us. With Ken Silverstein he wrote Washington Babylon; with Jeffrey St. Clair he has written or coedited several books including: Whiteout, The CIA, Drugs and the Press; The Politics of Anti-Semitism; Imperial Crusades; Al Gore, A User's Manual; Five Days That Shook the World; and A Dime's Worth of Difference, about the two-party system in America.

 

 

Articles

News and Features

The movement’s urgent challenge is to meet organized repression with organized resistance.

Welcome to the Drone Empire, in which the president's executioners can kill without legal restraint.

Our country has no need for the Keystone pipeline extension.

A bet on a horse in the 1949 Grand National resulted in the largest collective transfer of wealth ever to communism's stalwarts in Britain.

There is ferocious repression across the Middle East. Why are the UN's sights trained only on Libya?

To launch his reelection bid, the president took up a longstanding American tradition: extrajudicial political assassinations.

An invasion of privacy scandal threatens the careers to two of Murdoch's top executives and the apparent heir the News Corp. empire.

There are no effective “safeguards” against nuclear disasters, and Japan’s crisis is only the latest display of the overwhelming risks involved in splitting atoms for energy.

The former president set in motion a sizable slice of the fantasies destroying America.

The diplomat was spared the annoyance of seeing one of his best-known political creations accused of supervising the killing of captives in order to slice out their organs for transplants.

Blogs

With a new film out about Webb, Kill the Messenger, we look back at Cockburn’s testament to the investigative reporter.