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Articles | The Nation

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Democrats gather in Los Angeles facing large questions not just about
their success in November but also about the direction of their party.
George W.


CENTERING GORE
"They chose to close
ranks instead of opening up dialogue," California State Senator Tom
Hayden said after the Democratic Platform Comm

When Dubya picked Dick Cheney as his running mate, the little screen was
awash in flatulent flatteries from the chattering classes: "a grown-up,"
"presidential," "all steak and no sizzle" were

A part of me recoils at the thought of adding even a syllable to the
ocean of pontifical sludge emanating from the Republican confab in
Philadelphia, so mind-numbingly inane and diligently dece

Running from bank- and hotel-lined Wilshire Boulevard, up the glittering gulch of Rodeo Drive, past the slinky curves of Sunset and snaking up leafy Coldwater and Benedict canyons to the legend

When members of the LA janitors' union decided to go on strike this past
April, their success was far from guaranteed.

In this gilded-age election, big money is speaking louder than ever. And
voters and large contributors to both parties agree that when money
talks, politicians listen.

Ralph Nader, America's indomitable public citizen, is the one great man
in this presidential election.

It must be some playful new postmodernist form of politics: First you
spend years ranting about the plutocracy that has supplanted American
democracy and is rapidly devouring the planet.

Paying off the national debt used to be an obsession of Calvinist
fundamentalists on the fringes of the Republican Party, but this year it
is the boldest banner held aloft by the Democratic Par

On the eve of the Democratic convention, the challenge to Democrats is
to recognize the limits of the current economic boom and act boldly to
assist those left behind.

The draft Democratic Party platform doesn't speak forcefully to the
concerns of ordinary people.

Over the last two years, various government and congressional officials adroitly exploited leaks to the media to defame Wen Ho Lee, a Los Alamos nuclear scientist.

Have you ever wondered who really benefited from the Gulf War,
which will be celebrated this week at the Republican National Convention
as the crowning, if singular, achievement of the presidency

It is time to rally around our President and forego the constant drumbeat of criticism that has been his lot on the world stage ever since he discovered that foreign policy involves issues beyond

American politicians are not noted for their historical self-consciousness.

So ABC is arranging its convention coverage around an exhibition football game. NBC is giving us just the acceptance speeches.

UNWELCOMING THE REPUBLICANS "It's surprising that the Republicans are coming to Philadelphia, really surprising.

Eased into governance by years and years of conservative ideology, the corporations of America today effectively oversee the Congress, the regulatory agencies and indeed the presidency itself.

Perhaps it was because he was recovering from painful back surgery, but a few weeks before the Republican convention, Paul Weyrich, a founder of the religious right, was awful grumpy about George

It's no secret that the national conventions are no longer dramatic arenas in which the parties decide their presidential nominees or, for that matter, anything else of much importance.

Judith Miller is a New York Times reporter much in evidence on
talk shows and seminars on the Middle East.

Should the corporate owners of newspapers like the Los Angeles Times or the New York Post be allowed to own television stations in the same city?