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David Mamet's Heist is tasty, but not quite aces.

Even stalwart liberals are knuckling under to the security state in the wake of September 11.

The Justice Department under John Ashcroft is alienating allies in the 'war on terror.'

Embattled campus activists hone their message about the crisis in Afghanistan.

Now that the Taliban regime has fallen in Afghanistan, that group's leaders can face fair and open trials for their crimes against humanity.

A review of Lawrence Lessig's The Future of Ideas: The Fate of the Commons in the Connected World.

The Times fans the flames of public fear around the anthrax attacks.

Moral concern begins with the local, but shouldn't stop there.

Reviews of Grace Schulman's The Paintings of Our Lives and Stephen F. Cohen's Failed Crusade.

Laura Bush might put on a good face for women's rights in Afghanistan, but her husband's handwork works against women in other places.

Don Byron and Dave Douglas put the political back into jazz.

Noncitizens in the United States face an increasingly harsh Ashcroft-run Justice Department.

Florida revisited: Schadenfreude amid the carnage of the democratic process.

There is a link between our own cultural conflicts and the logic of jihad.

Ronald Reagan celebrated them as "freedom fighters" for upholding "the ideals of freedom and independence" and declared a day in their honor.

Father Roy Bourgeois, the charismatic Maryknoll priest who has, since 1990, led the annual protest against against the United States' most infamous military training facility, wasn't sure it would

NEW YORK--In the aftermath of September 11, pundits were quick to proclaim the American left a victim of the war on terrorism, for two reasons.

Biotechnology is hyped as the next big step in medicine—but is it all financial speculation?

2 movie reviews: Jung (War) in the Land of the Mujaheddin; Kandahar

Argentina finds out it's not easy being the poster child of neoliberalism.

Anthrax scare reveals racial denial: workers on Capitol Hill are evacuated and given protective drugs while exposed postal workers, most of them black, are forgotten.

George W. Bush, whose administration is addicted to secrecy, wants presidential papers classified indefinitely, not for the usual 12 years.