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Is our public health system ready?

Unions are edging into the peace movement, but they are still minor
players.

With Republicans in full control in Washington, next year's prospects
are grim.

In 2000, United Nations Secretary General Kofi Annan posed a question to
the Millennium Summit of the UN: "If humanitarian intervention is,
indeed, an unacceptable assault on sovereignty, how s

"I was in a highly unshaved and tatty state," John Lennon said of his 1966 meeting with a certain conceptual artist, then mounting her first show at London's Indica Gallery.

November has been melodrama month at the movies. First Todd Haynes
brought us Far From Heaven, which he ought to have called
Imitation of Imitation.

Abida Bano sits on the floor of a crowded makeshift relief building
in Ahmedebad, the largest city in Gujarat, holding her 10-month-old
daughter.

It didn't take long.

That is, for Nancy Pelosi, the new Democratic leader in the House of Representatives, to run for cover. Days after her colleagu...

(An Upper East Side Sea Chanty
Sung to the tune of 'Blow the Man Down')

President Bush, a scion of great wealth who has never had to earn an honest living, has abruptly wiped out the jobs, retirement security and health benefits of 850,000 blue- and white-collar

When the Clinton-Gore administration attempted to reform the nation's approach to financing health care in 1993 and 1994, the one proposal that administration aides always rejected was a single-payer health care system. Even when more Democratic members of the House endorsed a single-payer plan sponsored by US Rep. Jim McDermott, D-Washington, than any other proposal, the administration rejected attempts to cut costs and guarantee quality service for all with a fully government-funded system.

When Al Gore ran for president in 2000, he maintained his opposition to single-payer proposals. Such was Gore's opposition to investing in fundamental health care reforms that he went so far as to criticize costs associated with a plan, advanced by his Democratic primary challenger, Bill Bradley, to take modest steps toward universal coverage.

Now, however, as Gore edges toward another presidential campaign, he is singing a different tune. Wednesday night in New York, as he began a national book tour that many see as an attempt to raise his profile in advance of the 2004 contest, Gore announced that he had "reluctantly come to the conclusion" that the only way to respond to what he described as an "impending crisis" in health care is a "single-payer national health insurance plan" for all Americans.

In defeat, Democrats have convened their perennial circular firing
squad, issuing salvos of what Groucho Marx used to call
departee--what they should have said.

Iraq's decision to accept the United Nations Security Council
resolution, passed unanimously on November 8, sets in motion a tightly
scripted plan for UN arms inspectors to return to Iraq.

CORRECTION: John Eder of Maine, a Green, won state, not national, office.

When immigrant janitors in Boston went on strike this fall, they
attracted some unlikely allies.

The eleventh floor of the federal building in Newark is not a place
anyone visits by choice. The air-conditioning is always either too cold
or not cold enough.

The talk of war has done its job.
Rove's hopes were far exceeded.
So maybe, with the voting done,
The war itself's not needed.

Well, the elephant is out of the barn now. Congress is lost and whither
Congress, so will go the courts.


'BAFFLED' BY POLLITT

Princeton, NJ

Nancy Pelosi, a Democratic leader who knows how to fight and what to fight for.