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The people are asking for answers from the People's House.

Having elbowed the State Department aside and demanded full authority for overseeing the invasion and reconstruction of Iraq, Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld should be held accountable for the problems facing the US occupation, which include mounting US and Iraqi casualties, an increasingly sophisticated insurgency, rampant street crime and costs exceeding one billion dollars a week.

The Nation said it last April and it's more true than ever before: "The Defense Secretary should resign--now. Although George W. Bush is ultimately responsible for the catastrophe unfolding in Iraq, it is Donald Rumsfeld who is the Cabinet member directly charged with planning and carrying out the nation's wars." And he should take Wolfowitz, Feith and Perle with him.

As the Washington Post reported last week, Rumsfeld appears to be losing political support most dramatically on Capitol Hill, where many in Congress, even some conservative Republicans, are expressing concern about his handling of Iraq and his continued in-fighting with many in the military establishment. "Winning the peace is a lot different than winning the war," said Sen. Lindsey O. Graham (R-S.C.). Even the conservative Weekly Standard, now doing its own flip-flop, has taken aim at Rumsfeld calling him "mulish" and the "Secretary of Stubborness."

This coming week, President Bush will head to the United Nations to try to rally international support for his Iraq endeavor. After addressing the General A...

Forget about the economy. Forget about the environment. Forget about the mess that he has made of US relations with the rest of the world. The issue that is on George W. Bush's mind is more basic: Does a leader end up paying a political price if voters think he lied his country into an unwise and unnecessary war in Iraq?

For the answer to that question, the president and his aides might want to look to Britain, where Bush's closest comrade-in-arms before, during and since the Iraq invasion, Prime Minister Tony Blair, just took a political body blow.

In a multi-ethnic, working-class section of London that has for decades been a political stronghold for Blair's Labour Party, voters used a special election to fill a vacant seat in the Parliament to send the prime minister a message that has shaken the British political establishment. It is a message that ought to be heard, as well, in the United States.

"I want to do everything," Madonna said recently. I thought she was talking about positions. (I was a keen reader of her X-rated 1992 book of photography, Sex.) My twelve year old daughter thought she was talking about her MTV Video Music Awards' open-mouth pump and grind kissing routine with Britney Spears and Cristina Aguilera.

Turns out that we were clueless. Madonna has found another way to have it all. On September 15th, this kinder and gentler forty-four year old mother of two, America's premier mistress of reinvention (once married to bad boy Sean Penn and involved romantically with, among others, Warren Beatty and Dennis Rodman), tackled J.K. Rowling's empire.

Madonna's first children's book, English Roses, was simultaneously released in more than one hundred countries in forty two languages with all the hoopla and publicity that normally surrounds Rowling's Harry Potter. The plot is based on Madonna's spiritual lodestar Kabbalah--the mystical Jewish guide to the universe. ("Yikes, I for one never knew Madonna was Jewish," writes some strange columnist called Mr. Joel of Hollywood, an independent blogger.)

In his 1998 book, One Nation, After All, Alan Wolfe chided
liberals for their misapprehensions about the political attitudes of
ordinary Americans.

In her new book, Regarding the Pain of Others, Susan Sontag's
focus is upon theaters of war and the way in which photographers have
interpreted their role in the production of images of

In his 1997 song "Highlands," Bob Dylan reports a conversation between
himself and a waitress. "She says, You don't read women authors, do
you?/...

Politics as usual on the front-runner's tour.

September 11 is often said to be the defining moment in the Bush
presidency, even of modern history.

Click here to read more from Katha Pollitt.

Read special extracts from Jonathan Schell's new book, The Unconquerable World: Power, Nonviolence, and The Will of the People.

It may not do much good to beg her
To cast her vote for Schwarzenegger:
His flicks, the tales make pollsters rate her
A hater of the Terminator.

ANOTHER WIN FOR MEDIA DEMOCRACY

Democrats who want to deny Howard Dean the party's 2004 presidential
nomination have a new issue: They are complaining that the front-runner
is insufficiently unequivocal in his support for Isr

When activists began cobbling together a Draft Wesley Clark for
President campaign, their Internet initiative looked to be longer on
idealism than pragmatism. George W.

The collapse of the WTO talks in Cancún is in fact a profoundly
hopeful turn of events. The developing nations have found their
voice--and power.

The tangled web that a narrow Supreme Court majority wove to shut down
the Florida recount of presidential ballots in December 2000 made it
possible for Republican George W.

Two questions will dominate the 2004 presidential campaign: how to make
the United States secure in an age of terror, and how to get the economy
to work for all Americans. George W.

The threshold between one and zero
Blurs--
Blurs-- a drift of charge filters through--

Their reporters had the goods, but the Washington Post editors chose not to display them.


We were peppered with volleys of mail from the young, and others,
responding to Thomas Geoghegan's "Dems--Why Not Woo

'Misspeak' first for the front page, 'correct' it later in the back...