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Truth has a way of asserting itself despite all attempts to obscure it. Distortion only serves to derail it for a time.

After weeks of searching for weapons of mass destruction in Iraq, there's still no trace of the fearsome arsenal the Administration advertised. Back in the US, however, the Bush Administration is adding to our own stockpile of weapons of mass destruction by lifting a decade-old ban on research and testing of small nuclear weapons to allow for the development of "low yield" nukes for battlefield use.

The White House's Strangelovian nuclear policy signals a dramatic shift in US nuclear doctrine--one that undermines five decades of bipartisan efforts to delegitimize the use of nuclear weapons. What Senator Edward Kennedy called a "far-reaching and highly dangerous U-turn in our longstanding policy against the first use of nuclear weapons," was accelerated on May 20th when the Republican-controlled Senate turned back a Democratic effort to maintain the ban. "It's a one way street that can lead only to nuclear war," Kennedy warned.

If anyone needs evidence that the Administration's reckless policy is about to launch a new nuclear arms race, Russian President Vladimir Putin provided it on May 15th when he announced to the Russian Parliament his country will soon begin developing new nuclear weapons and low-yield nuclear devices of their own. His remark was met greeted by applause.

They're back now, but Texas's few living elected Democrats, who fled to
Oklahoma pursued by minions of the law, are said to remain unrepentant.
The proximate cause was a redistricting map, but

In the film from which there is no escape and no going back, The
Matrix
, the writer-director team of Andy and Larry Wachowski
presented a grim choice between truth and illusion.

Writing may be fighting, as Ishmael Reed famously opined, but most
writers know the difference. There are, of course, some who blur the
line.

In 1981 Carolyn Forché published a slim collection of verse, her
second, titled The Country Between Us.

From the mid to the late 1920s, the German painter Christian Schad
produced a group of paintings like little else in modern art.

The chief flaw of this plan is its failure to focus on the Israeli
occupation.

Rejectionists on both sides are trying to undermine the fledgling
initiative.

US drug firms make the choice clear: our outrageous profits or your
life.

If Americans have done their best to forget the war, so have the
Vietnamese.

Eight state legislators who are making a difference.

Sentient observers know that American state and local governments face a
historic crisis--that they are cutting vital services and raising taxes,
mainly on those already most stressed in diffic

Important battles are being waged--and won--far beyond the Beltway.

Of all the columns I've written, never have I gotten more mail than for
the following sentence: "It will not matter that the Dixie Chicks play
to full, cheering houses, while their current albu

Thank God for fakers! Matchless as deflaters of human and institutional
pretension, they furnish us rich measures of malicious glee at the
red-faced victims.

When he lands on the deck in his flight suit
To impress all the sailors he's greeting,
It looks grand, but there's one thing we're thinking:

America needs jobs, and working families are hurting. At the same time,
the war in Iraq has heightened awareness of our dependence on foreign
oil and the vulnerability of our energy system.

Whatever happened to the "worst of the worst"?

These are dog days for Democrats. The top-gun President continues to
ride high in the polls, despite the chaos in Iraq.

Clarification: George W. Bush's proclamation of Al Qaeda as "not a problem anymore" was a reference to top Al Qaeda
operatives, not the entire organization. (06/04/03)

With the June 2 vote by the Federal Communications Commission on a series of rule changes that would dramatically reshape the nation's media landscape rapidly approaching, it is abundantly clear that honest players in the debate have determined that making the changes would spell disaster for democratic discourse, cultural diversity and the public interest that the FCC is supposed to defend.

More than 100 members of Congress – ranging from Congressional Progressive Caucus stalwarts such as Vermont's Bernie Sanders and Ohio's Sherrod Brown to Congressional Black Caucus veterans such as Michigan's John Conyers and New York's Charles Rangel to Republican moderates such as Maine U.S. Senators Olympia Snowe and Susan Collins, as well as diehard conservatives such as U.S. Senators Trent Lott, R-Mississippi, and Wayne Allard, R-Colorado –have objected to the FCC's rush to eliminate rules that protect against media monopoly and corporate consolidation. Leaders of the AFL-CIO, the Leadership Council on Civil Rights, the National Council of La Raza, the Consumer Federation of America, Consumers Union and dozens of other public interest groups have signed letters demanding that the FCC seek more public comment before making decisions that they argue "could have a sweeping impact on what news and information Americans see and hear in the future." The Newspaper Guild, the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists, the National Association of Broadcasting Employees and Technicians, the National Association of Black Journalists, the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, the Association of Independent Video and Filmmakers, the Caucus for Producers, Writers and Directors, the American Federation of Musicians and the Future of Music Coalition have all warned that making the changes could undermine American journalism and culture. Close to 300 leading academics have come forward to say that the FCC is moving too quickly and without legitimate scholarship on these crucial rulemaking decisions. Rockers Pearl Jam, Tom Petty and Patti Smith have joined the chorus of concern, along with conservative columnist William Safire and the National Rifle Association, and the city councils of Chicago and Seattle, the Vermont House of Representatives. And public comments to the FCC have been running 20-1 against making changes that would allow the nation's largest media companies to control virtually all television, radio and newspaper communications in American communities.

Against such overwhelming opposition, what could it be that is driving the FCC to press forward with the June 2 vote? The answer may be found in a blockbuster report just released by the Washington-based Center for Public Integrity, which details how industry groups the FCC is supposed to be regulating have over the past eight years paid for more than 2,500 junkets taken by key FCC officials.