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As long as firms are willing to hire them, immigrants will come.

From the valuable listserv, " Democracy Dispatches," a project of Demos--the New York City-based Public Policy and Advocacy organization, which tracks and analyzes democracy issues in the states, comes news of a novel way to boost voter turnout.

The " Voter Reward" initiative in Arizona is designed to motivate people to vote by entering those who have cast ballots into a random drawing with a $1 million jackpot. (Before implementing the program, it would be necessary to change the Arizona law, which currently makes it illegal to pay people to get them to vote.)

Mark Osterloh, who helped pass the Arizona Clean Elections statute, is also the mastermind behind this idea. "Opponents will say we are bribing people to vote," he says. "We are not. What we are doing is rewarding behavior we want to encourage. The 'Voter Reward' program is not bribery; it is capitalism at its best." What's next? A recording contract and chance to sing on TV in return for pulling the lever?

What with Bush and his cronies on the road to raking in an unprecedented $200 million this campaign season, I admit it's hard to focus on small ticket outrages. But it's still worth looking at what's going on in South Carolina, where the state Democratic Party is considering allowing corporations to sponsor its next presidential primary.

It turns out that South Carolina is one of only two states that require the state parties to pay for the primaries, rather than picking up the tab itself. And, according to Democratic chief Joe Erwin, raising the estimated $500,000 in a soft economy has been tough. So, Erwin--a Greenville advertising executive--got the idea of soliciting corporate sponsorships, which he describes as a creative takeoff on the way ballparks sell ads on scoreboards or colleges name buildings after companies.

So, corporations could sponsor get-out-the-vote ads or signs outside polling places. According to the Charlotte Observer, the party originally considered allowing corporate sponsors to put their names on the ballot, but Erwin ruled that out. "It just didn't pass the common-sense test," he said.

Kingdom of Shadows, the sixth of Alan Furst's novels of historical espionage fiction, was hard for me to put down--and when I did, I couldn't wait to pick it up again.

The retail food workers strike in California may be the first in a series of battles that could shape the future of labor-management relations throughout the US.

Thanks to USA Today, the public now knows some of what Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld really thinks of the war of terrorism. And thanks t...

Ghosts are notorious for getting stuck in time. Having lost track of the
ongoing world, they will revisit certain hours as obsessively as they
haunt a fatal spot.

In a broad square not far from the center of Jakarta, a large obelisk of
concrete soars into the sky.

The best memoirs of recent years reveal "The Way We Live Now" as well as
or better than most contemporary fiction.

Abigail and Stephan Thernstrom have long been pillars of highbrow
conservatism in America.

Devising a fair federal policy for higher education would not be hard.

Opposition to the war among military families is bubbling beneath the surface.

He's an intriguing moral bellwether, Nathaniel Heatwole.

Enter the world of Paul Krugman, a world either dark (the eras of Bush I
and Bush II) or bathed in light (when Bill was king).

Arnold Schwarzenegger has sold himself to his fans as a raging
Republican Terminator.

Paul Wellstone won elections as a progressive by energizing and
mobilizing a large base, staying close to community organizing efforts
of all kinds and fearlessly pressing a bold agenda.

During the two years when he was exploring a bid for the 2000 Democratic
presidential nomination, Paul Wellstone spent a lot of time trying to
figure out how a progressive could get elected to

One reason the Bush Administration gave for going to war in Iraq was
Saddam Hussein's alleged ties to terrorists.

In early October, Iraq's US-appointed Governing Council awarded the
country's first mobile phone licenses to three companies from the Middle
East.

Iraq lies in ruin, the US military occupation is generating a sustained
guerrilla resistance, crime is rampant in Baghdad and an Iraqi civil war
along ethnic and religious lines is a real possi

In the end, George W. Bush got Congress to approve the $87 billion he
insisted on for the occupation and reconstruction of Iraq.

The Senate voted Tuesday to ban so-called "partial-birth" abortions, marking the end of eight years of legislative skirmishes and the beginning of a major court battle, which could begin even before President Bush signs the bill into law, which he's said he'll do.

This will become the first federal ban on a specific abortion method since a woman's constitutional right to have an abortion was established by the Supreme Court's Roe v. Wade decision in 1973.

As Nation editor Katrina vanden Heuvel writes in her weblog, this bill is just the latest in a series of increasingly aggressive assaults on women that Bush and his Administration have been launching since he took office. As abortion-rights activists like NARAL's Kate Michelman are pointing out, no one should be fooled as to the real intentions of this bill's sponsors: they want to take away a woman's right to choose.